Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
'Baahubali 2' to release in April 2017
Chennai : Filmmaker S.S. Rajamouli's magnum opus "Baahubali: The Conclusion" is slated to hit the screens on April 14, next year.
 
According to industry sources, the film's release date has been locked already.
 
"The principal shooting will be wrapped up by this year-end. The remaining months before the release will be used extensively for post-production and computer graphics work," a source from the film's unit told IANS.
 
"Baahubali: The Conclusion" is the second part in the franchise and it is tipped to be made on a higher budget than its predecessor.
 
The film stars Rana Daggubati, Prabhas, Tamannah Bhatia and Anushka Shetty, besides a few new additions to the second part.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article

User

Will announce decision on taxing EPF in parliament: Jaitley
New Delhi : Addressing the strong reaction provoked by the Budget 2016-17 proposal on tax treatment of provident fund contributions, Finance minister Arun Jaitley on Wednesday said he would announce the final decision on the matter when he replies to the debate on the Budget in parliament.
 
"Now there has been some reactions. When the debate comes up in parliament, I will give the government's response as to what decision we finally take in this matter," Jaitley told representatives of industry associations FICCI, CII and Assocham at a post-Budget 2016-17 meeting here.
 
In his budget speech on Monday, Jaitley said that 60 percent of withdrawals from the provident fund accounts will be taxed on contributions to be made after April 1.
 
The finance minister said the aim of the move is to make India a more insured and pensioned society.
 
"The revenue department had considered various aspects of the National Pension Scheme and Employee Provident Fund Organisation (EPFO). Their intention is not revenue raising, that was not the principal intention," he said.
 
"The EPFO has about 3.7 crore members, of which about 3 crore members are those in the earning category of Rs.15,000 and below. For them, there is no change. It is only those private sector employees who have just joined that this will impact them," he added.
 
With confusion created over whether only the interest will be taxed upon withdrawal, or the whole corpus itself built after April 1 this year, a finance ministry release on Tuesday said: "We have received representations today from various sections suggesting if the amount of 60 percent of corpus is not invested in annuity products, tax should be levied only on the accumulated returns of the corpus and not on the contributed amount."
 
"We have also received representations asking for not having any monetary limit on employer contribution under EPF because such limit is not there in NPS. The finance minister would be considering these suggestions and taking a view on it in due course," it added.
 
Meanwhile, platform for social change Change.org said in a release here on Wednesday that over one lakh people have supported a campaign started on their website on the EPFO issue.
 
A petition asking the ministry to withdraw the decision "went viral within two days and over one lakh people have expressed their outrage on this Change.org petition," it said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article

User

Are robots trustworthy when your life is at stake?
New York : Robots are unreliable in case of fire or other emergency situations but people trust them blindly, according to a new study.
 
People may trust a robot too much for their own safety in case of emergency situations, but the machine has proven itself unreliable.
 
"People seem to believe that these robotic systems know more about the world than they really do, and that they would never make mistakes or have any kind of fault," said Alan Wagner, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).
 
In a mock building fire, designed to determine whether or not people would trust a robot designed to help them evacuate a high-rise, researchers were surprised to find that the test subjects followed the robot's instructions, even when the machine's behaviour should not have inspired trust.
 
The researchers recruited a group of 42 volunteers, most of them were college students, and asked them to follow a brightly coloured robot that had the words "Emergency Guide Robot" on its side. 
 
The robot led the study subjects to a conference room, where they were asked to complete a survey about robots and read an unrelated magazine article. The subjects were not told the true nature of the research project.
 
In some cases, the robot, which was controlled by a hidden researcher, led the volunteers into the wrong room and travelled around in a circle twice before entering the conference room. 
 
For several test subjects, the robot stopped moving, and an experimenter told the subjects that the robot had broken down. 
 
Once the subjects were in the conference room with the door closed, the hallway through which the participants had entered the building was filled with artificial smoke, which set off a smoke alarm.
 
When the test subjects opened the conference room door, they saw the smoke, and the robot, which was then brightly-lit with red LEDs and white "arms" that served as pointers.
 
The robot directed the subjects to an exit in the back of the building instead of directing them towards the doorway, marked with exit signs that had been used to enter the building.
 
"We expected that if the robot had proven itself untrustworthy in guiding them to the conference room, people wouldn't follow it during the simulated emergency," said Paul Robinette, a GTRI research engineer who conducted the study as part of his doctoral dissertation. 
 
"Instead, all of the volunteers followed the robot's instructions, no matter how well it had performed previously. We absolutely didn't expect this."
 
The research is scheduled to be presented on March 9 at the 2016 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction in Christchurch, New Zealand.
 
Earlier research has shown that people often don't leave buildings when fire alarms sound, and that they sometimes ignore nearby emergency exits in favour of more familiar building entrances.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)