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49% of RTI applications about information that is deliberately hidden from public
According to a study, nearly 49% of  RTI applications are about information that ought to be available in the public domain as mandated under Section 4 of the RTI Act and another 18% are about information that should routinely be provided to citizens
 
It has been nine years since the Right to Information (RTI) Act has been implemented but what the most notable defiance by the public authorities is the proactive disclosure under Section 4. The Peoples Monitoring Report conducted by RTI Assessment and Advocacy Group (RAAG) and SAMYA – Centre for Equity Studies once again proves that the government is hell bent on official secrecy.
 
The in-depth study conducted by Anjali Bharadwaj, Amrita Johri and Shekhar Singh, across several states pinpoints to various facets of the RTI Act, but the section on pro-active disclosures is particularly distressing. The report states: “Nearly 70% of the RTI applications seek information that should have been proactively made public without citizens having to file an RTI application. About 49% sought information, which should have been proactively provided under section 4 of the RTI Act (or other similar sections in other laws). While 18% sought information that should have been proactively provided to the applicant without her having to file an RTI application either because they were responses that should have been given as per prescribed office procedures or under other laws.” 
 
The study recommends that one or more Public Information Officers (PIOs) should be allocated the duty of ensuring whether Section 4 provisions are being implemented. The Information Commission should institute an enquiry if the PIO fails to provide information which comes under Section 4. The Commission should award compensation to the RTI applicant in the case of a second appeal wherein the information should have been pro-actively disclosed. The nodal agencies should ensure that public authorities are regularly updating information and templates that have been made for pro-active disclosures should be used widely by public authorities. Taking the Mizoram example, no payment should be levied on the RTI applicant for any information that he or she should have rightfully got under Section 4 of the RTI Act. The study also suggests the services of private agencies to monitor the implementation.
 
Following are the recommendations in detail:
Appoint PIO to oversee Sec 4 compliance: Given the very poor implementation of Section 4 of the RTI Act by most public authorities (Pas), the Department of Personnel and Training (DoPT) and the state nodal agencies should direct all PAs to designate one or more PIOs as responsible for ensuring compliance with all the provisions of section 4. Where these directions are not complied with by the PAs within a reasonable period, the ICs should use s. 19(8) (a) (ii) which  “require” that each PA designate one or more PIOs responsible for ensuring compliance with all the provisions of section 4. [DoPT, state nodal departments, ICs] 
 
Institute enquiry against PIOs who do not comply: Where a complaint is received against non-compliance with any provision of Section 4, especially 4(1) (b), (c), and (d), the commission should institute an enquiry under s. 18(1)(f) read with s. 18(2) of the RTI Act, against the designated PIO or any other official responsible, as per S. 5(4) and 5(5) of the RTI Act. If the PIO or any other official is found guilty, an appropriate penalty should be imposed by the IC, under s. 20(1) of the RTI act
 
Applicant should be compensated for waste of time: Where an appeal or complaint comes before an IC relating to information that should rightly have been made available suo motu under section 4 of the RTI Act, but was not, the IC should also exercise its powers under S. 19(8)(b) and award compensation to the appellant/complainant for having to waste time and energy seeking information that should have been provided proactively. The IC should also direct the PA to provide the information free of cost
 
PIOs should consistently update information: To ensure that the information is proactively put out and is up to date, the RTI nodal agencies should direct all PAs that each web site, and other medium and publication, relating to S. 4 compliance must carry the date (where appropriate for each bit of information) on which the information was uploaded/printed and the date till which it is valid/it would be revalidated. ICs should encourage compliance by imposing heavy penalties and awarding compensation…
 
Templates for proactive disclosures should be widely used: Though the DoPT has developed some comprehensive templates to facilitate proactive disclosure of information3 these are not yet being widely used. Also, many more templates are required for proactive disclosure of many other types of information. Therefore, appropriate governments and competent authorities should commission professional agencies to develop additional templates and to promote their use across public authorities
 
Take help of professional agencies: A coordinated approach needs to be developed and implemented with nodal agencies and information commissions pushing public authorities to proactively disclose an increasing amount of information. Professional agencies can be encouraged to help the PAs do this, and even in some cases to take the responsibility of effectively displaying and regularly updating the information, on behalf of the PA. In many countries, including the USA, agencies external to the PA are given the responsibility of ensuring that public declarations required under the law are easily accessible, accurate, comprehensive, and updated.
 
Applicants should get information free of cost: Learning from Mizoram (see Box 7.7 in Chapter 7), all appropriate governments and competent authorities should make a rule that no fee or additional fee would be charged for any application seeking information that should have been proactively provided or disclosed, but was not. ICs should also order refund of fee and additional fee when it comes to their notice that such fee has been charged for information that should actually have been, but was not, available proactively. This would encourage all PAs to ensure that all that was legally required to be proactively displayed or communicated was being disclosed. 
 
The report rightly points out: “Imagine the saving in paper, PIO, FAA, and IC time, and the time of 30 lakh applicants.’’
 
Here is the circular released by the Indian government on proactive disclosures under Section 4 of the RTI Act…
 
 
(Vinita Deshmukh is consulting editor of Moneylife, an RTI activist and convener of the Pune Metro Jagruti Abhiyaan. She is the recipient of prestigious awards like the Statesman Award for Rural Reporting which she won twice in 1998 and 2005 and the Chameli Devi Jain award for outstanding media person for her investigation series on Dow Chemicals. She co-authored the book “To The Last Bullet - The Inspiring Story of A Braveheart - Ashok Kamte” with Vinita Kamte and is the author of “The Mighty Fall”.)

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COMMENTS

Ramesh B Mhadlekar

2 years ago

RBI believes in evading replies under RTI specifically regarding the foreign tours of its executives, abuse of car facilities by family members of the executives, information pertaining to the perks of the executives etc. It cares a foot for the act and the supreme legislature of this country and it knows that the corruption in claiming bogus bills cannot be exposed since they are not audited by the CAG. The day the Hon. Modi government desires or wishes that RBI should be audited by the CAG, several heads may roll altogether.

Praveen Sakhuja

2 years ago

efforts of team are worth appreciation. BUT can we trust PA's those will have some impact of this survey and mend their ways in Public Interest, I doubt. It is failure of government that has big team of officials sitting in DoPT to issue circulars/guidelines and orders one fate the other without any check whether the past such documents have been duly recognized and contained instructions have been implemented. If 'YES' fine and if finds 'NO" what action has been initiated - I say NIL. Then who u expect PA's to become sincere and faithful to RTI act and citizens of India.

REPLY

Ramesh B Mhadlekar

In Reply to Praveen Sakhuja 2 years ago

DOPT simply issues the circulars or guidelines and refuses to take action against those who do not implement the same.

Ramesh B Mhadlekar

In Reply to Praveen Sakhuja 2 years ago

DOPT simply issues the circulars or guidelines and refuses to take action against those who do not implement the same.

Ramesh B Mhadlekar

In Reply to Praveen Sakhuja 2 years ago

DOPT simply issues the circulars or guidelines and refuses to take action against those who do not implement the same.

MOHAN

2 years ago

The National Human Rights Commission has issued show-cause Notice to Siby Mathews in ISRO SPY CASE

(Siby Mathews is currently the Chief Information Commissioner of Kerala)

http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/k...

8 Ways to make India healthy and wealthy
Each politician worth his salt wants more medical schools and larger hospitals in India. Instead of the quick fix idea of more hospitals, doctors and specialists, here are the eight steps that would make India healthy and wealthy 
 
Pharmaceutical drugs are no panacea for human suffering either. A close look at the peer reviewed leading medical journals show that American medicine, which we in India follow in Toto frequently causes more harm than good! In hospital adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the US affect 2.2 million patients. Antibiotics are the next menace for the environment both for humans and all other creatures as shown in previous article (Read: Drug pollution as an environmental disaster?). Dr Richard Besser, of the CDC, in 1995, said the number of unnecessary antibiotics prescribed annually for viral infections was 20 million. Dr Besser, in 2003, now refers to tens of millions of unnecessary antibiotics. The number of unnecessary medical and surgical procedures performed annually is 7.5 million. The number of people exposed to unnecessary hospitalization annually is 8.9 million. The total number of iatrogenic deaths is 783,936. It is evident that the American medical system is the leading cause of death and injury in the US. The 2001 heart disease annual death rate is 699,697, the annual cancer death rate, 553,251.
 
A report from the Centre for Health Programme Evaluation in Australia tells a similar story. This study looked specifically at the doctor patient ratio.  “There is now documented evidence that adverse events associated with medical interventions have a seriously deleterious effect on population health. However, this literature does not indicate whether or not the net effect of an increase in the doctor supply is positive or negative. There are, additionally, other mechanisms by which an increase in the doctor supply could reduce the quality and length of life. This paper revisits two hypotheses concerning doctor induced poor health. Econometric results using Australian cross-sectional data are presented. They are consistent with the hypothesis that an increase in the doctor supply is associated with an increase in mortality.” 
 
The authors give the following explanations for this mess. “That increasing the doctor supply may cause the population to become increasingly dependent on medical services to maintain their health. People neglect lifestyle factors. Put another way, responsibility shifts from the individual to the doctor.”
 
More doctors and less health is a proven fact in fourteen other industrialised countries, from Japan to US, audited in 2000 AD. Please take these findings seriously, before we start the same killing spree as our politicians want more medical schools and larger hospitals in India. Each politician worth his salt wants a medical college. Every Chief Minister wants an All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) like hospital in every state capital. The truth would be that it will be better for the country and its populace even if the existing AIIMS is closed and the money thus saved is being used to upgrade the hard working tired horses like the Safdarjung-like Hospitals in the capital. The only inconvenience might be for our politicians and top bureaucrats in Delhi! They claim that AIIMS does research. May I ask as to which area of medicine’s wisdom has advanced by the research done in AIIMS since its inception? “Knowledge advances NOT by repeating known facts, but by REFUTING false dogmas in any field,” wrote Karl Popper. 
 
Audit on medical research, published in the best journals in the world, has revealed that nearly 90% of the research funded by the industry could not be replicated independently! This figure jumps to 95% in cancer research, most of which is plain fraud. David Eddy of Stanford showed that only 15% of what doctors do is based on sound science and 85% on wrong research.  
 
Instead of the quick fix idea of more hospitals, doctors and specialists, here is what we need to do urgently for our healthcare. This would make India healthy and wealthy.
  1. Clean drinking water, sanitation of the best variety, three meals a day for everyone uncontaminated by animal and/or human excreta 
  2. A roof on top in place of the star-lit sky 
  3. Schooling for all kids and specially girl kids 
  4. Delayed marriage for girls for lowering the fertility rates 
  5. Better nutrition for pregnant mothers, especially in the first trimester to reduce still births and to beget healthy offsprings
  6. Better sanitation for decreasing perinatal mortality 
  7. Encouraging normal home birthing by strengthening the specially trained midwife services in far flung villages 
  8. Avoidance of cooking gas laden with carbon monoxide from coming into the house, using smokeless choolas, and introducing healthy habits in schools through Yoga and meditation 
 
“It is easier to argue that something nobody believes in actually exists than it is to argue that something everybody believes in is unreal.” - Samuel R Delany
 
(Professor Dr BM Hegde, a Padma Bhushan awardee in 2010, is an MD, PhD, FRCP (London, Edinburgh, Glasgow & Dublin), FACC and FAMS. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Science of Healing Outcomes, chairman of the State Health Society's Expert Committee, Govt of Bihar, Patna. He is former Vice Chancellor of Manipal University at Mangalore and former professor for Cardiology of the Middlesex Hospital Medical School, University of London.)  

User

COMMENTS

Amol Chavan

2 years ago

I agree. The yoga (pranayam included) is very necessary to be taught to our school children's as it will inject the discipline to do it on regular basis life time and reap the benefit life long. All minor and mostly major illness will not even touch our population if the ancient tradition yoga is practiced daily. I suggest a few pranayam + yogasana + walk/jog will do the trick for us and save us billion in long run.

Narendra Doshi

2 years ago

Let this article be read and implemented by as many common man, doctors, politicians, NGOs , funds allotters and spenders etc. Each word is priceless in this article and the maximum it is implemented and a fast as possible, we Indians will INDEED NOT ONLY BE HEALTHY BUT ALSO WEALTHY.

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