World
Australian newspapers launch survival campaign

Newspaper advertising revenue has fallen dramatically for years and with digital ads worth only a small fraction of print ones, publishers feel they need to be proactive in promoting the medium

 

Australia's biggest media companies are joining forces to save their printed newspapers from extinction as increased online media has caused circulation and advertising to plummet in recent years.
 
APN News and Media, Fairfax, News Corp, and Seven West have launched a "Influential by Nature" pro-newspaper campaign to convince advertisers to continue the circulation of the print editions, Xinhua news agency reported.
 
Newspaper advertising revenue has fallen dramatically for years and with digital ads worth only a small fraction of print ones, publishers feel they need to be proactive in promoting the medium.
 
In 2014, newspapers lost A$127 million ($96 million) in ad revenue compared to 2013 with newspapers in city areas losing the most -- down 16 percent year-on-year, latest figures revealed.
 
This year, Goldman Sachs estimated that print's share of the Australian advertising market will crash from about 20 percent to 1.2 percent by 2025.
 
The media companies say newspapers are better influencers than other media because they are "local, topical and relevant". 
 

User

Environmental pollution and India's competitiveness
The environment in India most often appears as a classic case of 'tragedy of the commons'
 
Walking down most streets in any major city in India, one notices pollution in one form or another. The air most times causes a burning sensation, or if that is missing, one can at least see empty cold drinks' bottles, wrappers and the like thrown across the streets. It appears all-pervasive.
 
The environment in India most often appears as a classic case of "tragedy of the commons". According to this, because nobody owns a natural resource, therefore, everybody pollutes it - and nobody is accountable for it. Cases abound of rivers, lakes, ponds or our surroundings getting a fraction of what we consume. In the capital city Delhi, the river Yamuna is reduced to nothing more than a dumping ground from retail as well as industrial polluters. Six recent developments merit attention with respect to the environmental situation in India.
 
First, even with the things that we can avoid, like wrappers, plastic bottles, cold drinks nd the like, we tend to throw them outside. Most places we visit as tourists or even for a casual outdoor walk, we tend to throw our stuff outside. It is as if the business model of consumption-oriented companies is wired for this sort of behavior. A soft drink bottle or a wrapper of our favorite chips is easily accessible and easily disposable. Part of the problem is also that we do not have bins at as many places as we have consumable items. So that, in a way, culminates into a divine right to pollute the places we live in. 
 
Second, the government is actively taking part in a major debate that is happening about the ongoing environmental issues in India. The present government's Swachh Bharat Abhiyan, as well as Clean Ganga Mission are aimed at this. However, so long as there is no social consensus on the issues, much will remain unaccomplished.
 
Third, recent reports suggest that India has extremely high levels of environmental pollution especially air pollution. A recent report by World Health Organization (WHO) points to the fact that India is home to 13 of the top 20 cities for air pollution. It is because India's air has a lot of PM (particulate matter) 2.5 that is instrumental in a large number of lung ailments. The health risks of living in such a toxic environment cannot be overstated. These include the onset of asthma and cancer as well as triggers to heart attack and stroke. Most of the diseases reduce life expectancy and cause losses in the productive capability of a nation. The collective impact of pollution is thus detrimental and not just limited to quality of life today but for the future as well.
 
Fourth, much can be done at this stage to reduce pollution. It does not necessarily mean blocking projects that are critical to national development but bringing in stringent guidelines for automobile manufacturers to comply with stricter pollution standards. It also means bettering public transport systems, especially MRTS (Mass Rapid Transport Systems), for people to migrate to them. These would help reduce the toxic levels that we see today in our urban centers. The scrapping of the diesel subsidy is a step in the right direction as it makes it costlier to consume the fuel. 
 
Fifth, acknowledgement of the problem is a must for being in a position to solve it. In this regard, the recent National Air Quality Index (AQI) is also a step in the right direction. The index has uniform six categories - Good, Satisfactory, Moderately polluted, Poor, Very Poor, and Severe. The AQI also considers eight pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, CO, O3, NH3, and Pb) for which short-term (up to 24-hourly averaging period) National Ambient Air Quality standards are prescribed. It makes the AQI robust. Hopefully in the coming years, the Index helps policymakers and citizens decide which road to take for development. 
 
Sixth, India's rank on global indices like the Social Progress Index (SPI) is a cause of concern. The Index goes beyond pure GDP measures and looks at social and environmental measures that are imperative for social progress and quality of life. No wonder that the recently released SPI ranks India at a dismal 101st position out of 133 countries considered for the Index. Striking underperformance is observed in the Index under 'household pollution' (110th rank) and 'health and wellness' dimensions (120th rank) factors. 
 
All this reflects the need is to look at the environment in a holistic manner. The path taken by other countries, particularly America, for personal fulfillment and growth over the past few centuries may not be appropriate for India at this juncture with the kind of population and resources that we have. Also, a sense of civic duty towards our surroundings will contribute to making the country clean. More importantly it will also make people healthy and productive. It may indeed unleash the ‘demographic dividend’ that will boost growth and competitiveness.

User

COMMENTS

Ravi

2 years ago

Black Future of Water by Ravi Palwankar 2009

https://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tt9iFTDu06Q&feat...

Ravi

2 years ago

Black Future of Water by Ravi Palwankar 2009

https://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tt9iFTDu06Q&feat...

Pulse Beat

Death Due to Breathing

Some time back, a study showed that pollution in our capital city, Delhi, is killing its citizens, especially children. A similar study done in Bengaluru also showed that the southern city was inhospitable for children below five. The changes and the effect on their bodies carry on to adulthood; and now we know that evolution is primarily environmental and not genetic. Though the Delhi study could be criticised on many counts as not being perfect, the fact remains, even without that study, that these landlocked cities are becoming death holes as they are bursting at their seams with fossil-fuel wastes and other pollutants, like pollen in Bengaluru. Wake up Arvind Kejriwal, do something to save the children of the city which gave you all its votes!
 

Cancer and Its Environment 

Cancer is a bunch of aimless, jobless, wandering mutated cells that eventually settle down in one organ or place in a human body. They are our own cells and are not demons from the outer world. Why our own cells become our enemies is a million-dollar question. The new theory of evolution gives credence to an old hypothesis about cancer being an environmental insult on our system. Hypoxia, acidic environment and cell necrosis are our enemies vis-à-vis cancer.
 
Given this background, chemotherapy, radiation and mutilating surgery do not seem to be the logical treatment for cancer. Logically, then, natural good oxygen supply by physiological breathing, avoiding acidic food and making the biggest environment of man, his mind, tranquil would go a long way in a preventing cancer and also in curing it. 
 

‘Tobacco Does Not Kill’

How on earth does a politician suddenly become a scientist overnight? A member of Parliament (MP) has come out with such startling data from his ‘study and observation’. Initially, in the 1950s, even scientists were not convinced about the link between tobacco and mortality. Doll and Hill at Oxford did painstaking research to connect the two and thousands of lives have been saved from possible tobacco deaths. Even if the MP feels that tobacco and cancer and not related, he cannot deny that smoking will eventually lead to disabling emphysema that the smoker feels s/he is in hell on earth with incapacitating breathlessness.
 

Just a Slogan

 
‘Prevention is better than cure’ is a good business slogan to net more and more healthy individuals under the drug and intervention umbrella for the health of the disease-care industry. Health promotion is far better than cure and intervention at a late stage. Health promotion is to give the populace good food, clean water, sanitation, education, economic empowerment and female education for the good of the next generation.
 
When one applies disease statistics to healthy people, up to 25% of them become sick (false positives). That is why less people die in places with fewer doctors per capita and lesser specialists. Doctors going on strike had cut mortality and morbidity significantly in the past, in many countries! Let nature teach us our science and let us not teach our science to nature.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)