Companies & Sectors
Auction of telecom spectrum concludes after 19 days
After 19 days of rigorous bidding, the auction of airwaves for telecom operators concluded Wednesday, with officials initially placing the figure of cumulative bids at over Rs.100,000 crore.
 
The auction was conducted for 800 MHz, 900 Mhz, 1800 MHz and 2100 MHz covering both mobile telephony and broadband, including 4G.
 
Till Tuesday, the government had received cumulative commitments of Rs.109,000 crore from the eight telecom operators in the fray -- Reliance Communications, Reliance Jio, Bharti Airtel, Vodafone India, Tata Teleservices, Uninor, Idea Cellular and Aircel.
 
A reserve price of Rs.3,423 crore per MHz was fixed for 800 MHz frequency, Rs.3,399 crore for 900 MHz band and Rs.1,425 crore for the 1,800 MHz band. The government also fixed a reserve price of Rs.3,511 crore per megahertz for the frequency for 3G spectrum.

User

India, Australia renew rivalry in World Cup semis
An undefeated India will face their biggest challenge of the cricket World Cup when they take on co-hosts and four-time champions Australia in the latter's backyard at the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) here on Thursday.
 
There has been a lot of talk about the match ever since the two teams made the last four during the previous week. Australian players have been playing mind games that their much touted pacers will deliver "short stuff" to Indian batsman, who are traditionally more comfortable playing off their pads.
 
Looking at the mind games being played by Australia and the calm displayed by the Indians, it gives one an idea how the two teams are preparing for the clash.
 
The Aussies also have not stopped short of reminding the defending champions of their dismal tour Down Under this Australian summer. 
 
India lost the Test series 0-2 and did not even win a single match in the One-Day International (ODI) tri-series, also involving England.
 
However, come Thursday, the co-hosts will be facing the same men but with a different mentality and attitude. This Indian team is on a seven-match winning-streak, shoving aside everything that has come their way. It won't be the same easy run that Australia had this summer.
 
The World No.1 side, on the other hand, have lost a match in this tournament, against New Zealand. The quarterfinal against Pakistan also showed that their batting order is brittle, something that Indian pacers would like to exploit.
 
India's bowling has been the main reason for their success in the tournament. Pacers Mohammed Shami, Umesh Yadav and Mohit Sharma have been brilliant. 
 
They have done nothing extraordinary, just stuck to the basics by bowling on good line-and-length with accuracy and consistency.
 
The SCG wicket traditionally is slower in comparison to other pitches in Australia. The track could also prove to be friendly for Ravichandran Ashwin, who has been one of the best spinners of the tournament. The offie could prove to be the difference in the semifinal clash.
 
When it comes to the batting, the top order has struck for India. When they failed, the lower order came good, especially while chasing. 
 
So the bottom line is that Mahendra Singh Dhoni's top-six batsmen have shown their class and ability to get runs and they should be able to cope with the much touted Australian pace attack.
 
Don't forget Rohit Sharma scored his double century against Australia and also a hundred in the tri-series before the World Cup.
 
The only thing that makes the match 50-50 is that Australia are playing at home. But they are not exactly happy that they are playing at the SCG and the stadium would be a blue of humanity.
 
For people who believe in statistics, they will easily bet their money on Australia. The co-hosts have won 12 of their 13 ODIs against India at the historic ground. 
 
Also, Australia have never lost in the semifinals of the World Cup, having won five and tied one.
 
But come Thursday, it will be the on-field performances and not stats that will matter.

User

Odisha monk campaigns to save indigenous cow
A monk in Odisha has launched a campaign to save the state's native cow breeds that are on the brink of extinction.
 
Paramahamsa Prajnanananda, the spiritual leader of the Kriya Yoga of Prajnana Mission, has kept over 150 cows of Odisha's indigenous varieties at his ashrams and urges others, especially farmers, to follow suit.
 
Prajnanananda, 55, said he stayed three years ago in Rajasthan where such conservation had proved successful.
 
After returning to Odisha, he started collecting native varieties cows and nurturing them.
 
"Initially we started with a few. Later the number gradually increased," said the saffron-robed who has travelled widely around the world to promote Kriya Yoga -- a spiritual form of yoga.
 
"The milk we consume today from hybrid cow is type A1 which can contribute to diseases. But the milk of the native cow is type A2 which is good for health," Prajnanananda told IANS, seated in Hariharananda Gurukulam, an ashram near Puri city.
 
Situated in the natural surrounding of forests, about 60 km from Bhubaneswar, the ashram houses over 50 cows and calves, mostly of Odisha's indigenous varieties as well as over 200 stray cattle.
 
The milk produced by the cows cater to the daily needs of hundreds of ashram inmates and regular visitors.
 
The Hariharananda Balashram, the Prajnana Mission's another religious centre in Kendrapada district, his birthplace, also houses about 85 cows and calves.
 
Spread over about 10 acres, the ashram also runs a residential school which has 500 children, mostly orphans. They get quality education free of charge up to Class 10.
 
The students, staff and other inmates consume milk produced by the ashram cows.
 
The holy man, who has written and translated numerous books on spiritual topics, said the forested areas in the ashram complex provide the domestic animals the natural grazing fields.
 
He said efforts were under way to collect more such cows.
 
"From time immemorial the cow has been the backbone of our agrarian economy," he told IANS. "The milk, curd, ghee, cow dung and cow urine of the native cows have medicinal properties."
 
He lamented that their use has been almost lost.
 
Prajnanananda has been organising meetings across the state in recent years, motivating farmers to go for and protect the indigenous cow. "Many of them have started preserving the native varieties," he said.
 
"We plan to set up six 'goshala' (cow shelters) in Odisha to preserve the native cows and bulls," he said.
 
The native cow's population in Odisha was 13,144,359 in 2003. This fell to 10,315,499 according to the livestock census of 2012, the most recent.
 
Although the state has several native cow breeds, only four have been listed in the National Registry by the National Bureau of Animal Genetic Resource (NBAGR).
 
Prajnanananda, who was an economics professor at the Ravenshaw College in Cuttack before becoming a monk in 1995, said most native cows have evolved naturally through adaptation to Odisha's agro-ecological conditions.
 
They derive their names from the place of their origin or on the basis of prominent characteristics.
 
One species seen in Malkangiri district stands less than one metre tall -- and is not found anywhere else in the world.
 
Another species seen in Jajpur district gives high yield and has greater immunity to a host of livestock diseases.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)