Technology
As net use spreads, cyber crimes up 19 times over 10 years
Cyber crimes reported in India rose 19 times over the last 10 years (2005 to 2014), from 481 in 2005 to 9,622 in 2014. India is now ranked third - after the US and China - as a source of “malicious activity” on the internet, second as a source of “malicious code” and fourth and eight as a source or origin for web attacks and network attacks.
 
Arrests involving cyber crimes also rose nine times from 569 in 2005 to 5,752 in 2014, according to National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) data, even as more Indians logged on to the internet.
 
Internet subscribers in India crossed the 400 million mark, and are expected to reach 462 million by June 2016.
 
As many as 9,622 cyber crimes were reported in 2014, an increase of 69 per cent over 2013. Of these, 7,201 were reported as offences under the Information Technology (IT) Act, 2,272 under the Indian Penal Code (IPC) and 149 under Special and Local Laws (SLL).
 
Under the IT Act, the most - 5,548 cases - reported were computer-related offences, of which 4,192 were under Section 66A, which allows for jail terms up to two-three years for sending “offensive messages through communication service” and related offences.
 
Section 66A of the IT Act was struck down by the Supreme Court in March 2015, saying: “Such a law hit at the root of liberty and freedom of expression, the two cardinal pillars of democracy."
 
IndiaSpend previously reported how India was following Turkey and Russia in restrictive internet laws. India ranked 136th, Turkey 149th and Russia 152nd in the 2015 Press Freedom Index, issued by Reporters Without Borders, a Paris-based non-profit.
 
Obscenity, cheating, sexual exploitation-India’s leading cyber crimes
 
As many as 758 cases were registered for publication or transmission of obscene or sexually explicit content under the IT Act.
 
Cheating (1,115) was the most reported crime, accounting for nearly 50 percent of IPC crimes. Under SSL offences, copyright violation was the most reported crime (118 of 149).
 
“Greed/financial gain” were the major motives behind cybercrime cases in 2014 with 1,736 cases, followed by “insult to modesty of women (599)”, fraud or illegal gain (495), sexual exploitation (357) and “personal revenge/settling scores (285)”.
 
Maharashtra reported the most cyber crimes (1,879) in 2014, double the cases (907) of the previous year.
 
Uttar Pradesh was second (1,737), followed by Karnataka (1,020), Telangana (703) and Rajasthan (697). The top five states accounted for 63 percent of all cases in 2014.
 
As many as 5,752 people were arrested for cyber crimes in 2014 - 5,744 Indians and eight foreigners. As many as 95 persons were convicted and 276 acquitted for cyber crimes in 2014.
 
Uttar Pradesh reported the most (1,223) arrests in 2014, followed by Maharashtra (942), Telangana (429), Madhya Pradesh (386) and Karnataka (372).
 
More than 8,000 websites were hacked in the first three months of 2016, and as many as 13,851 spamming violations were reported, according to a Lok Sabha reply on May 4, 2016.
 
Cyber security crimes, such as phishing, scanning, introducing malicious code, website intrusion and denial of service, rose 76 percent over the last five years, from 28,127 in 2011 to 49,455 in 2015.
 
As many as 13,083 and 11,997 cases related to automated teller machines (ATMs), credit/debit cards and net banking frauds were reported by banks during 2014-15 and 2015-16 (till December 2015), respectively, according to a Rajya Sabha reply on April 29, 2016.
 
Cyber frauds - ATM/credit/debit cards and net banking - cost Rs 226 crore ($38 million) over the last three financial years, 2012-13 to 2014-15.
 
Cyber crimes cost India $4 billion (Rs 24,630 crore) in 2013, according to a report commissioned by the Delhi High Court.
 
The global cost of cybercrime was estimated between $375 billion (Rs 2,512,500 crore) and $575 billion (Rs 3,852,500 crore), according to a World Bank 2016 report, quoting a 2014 study. The average per person cost of data breaches ranged from $51 in India to $201 in the United States, it said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Cold shock: E.coli bacteria found in 92% ice samples in Mumbai
Beware before you ask for ice cubes to chill up your soft drinks, fruit or milk shakes or a favourite cocktail anywhere outside. The BrihanMumbai Municipal Corporation revealed on Thursday that it found the dreaded E. coli bacteria in 92% of all ice samples tested prior to the monsoon across the city.
 
The presence of the bacteria - indicative of inferior/impure quality of water used to freeze into ice-cubes - can lead to severe gastroenteritis, diarrhea, vomiting, food poisoning and other illnesses.
 
The samples were tested in all 24 BMC wards from ice sellers, hotels, restaurants, bars, juice stalls, dairies, sweetmeat shops, ice-gola vendors, fast food outlets, lassi sellers, etc.
 
The development comes barely a week after bread - used widely in homes and by Mumbaikars in the form of sandwiches, 'vada-pavs', 'pav-bhaji' and other quick meals - was found to contain certain potentially carcinogenic substances.
 
Of the tests outcome, more than a quarter - 26% - of water and food samples collected and tested from street food and drinks vendors were found to contain the bacteria, the BMC said.
 
A total of 948 ice samples were taken across Mumbai of which a whopping 870 - or 92% - were found to be infected.
 
Of the 476 water samples collected from streetside vendors, 126 - or 26% - tested positive for the presence of the bacteria, during the sampling done in May, prior to onset of monsoon which brings in many water-borne diseases in the city.
 
Following the outcome, Municipal Commissioner Ajoy Mehta has directed further stringent measures to check the quality of ice, water and food among all vendors to prevent outbreak of any major health issues during the upcoming monsoons.
 
In certain areas of the city, like B, C, D, F-North, G-North, K-East, R-South, N and T wards, the entire, or 100%, ice samples were found to contain E. coli bacteria, while the overall city percentage came to 92%.
 
The samples were collected from 552 shops, 2,995 street vendors and the tests were conducted on 1.12 tonnes of sweetmeats, 4.56 tonnes of all types of eatables, 4.81 tonnes of all types of water/drinks.beverages, 3.90 tonnes fruits-vegetables, and after finding the alarmingly high presence of E. coli, the stocks were immediately destroyed.
 
The BMC has appealed to Mumbaikars to exercise utmost caution before consuming food or drinks outside to safeguard their health, especially with monsoon round the corner.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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RBI asks banks to install cyber security policy
In view of recent increase in online attacks on financial institutions' information systems, India's central bank on Thursday advised commercial banks to immediately put in place a cyber security policy in order to counter threats arising from the internet.
 
"Banks should immediately put in place a cyber-security policy elucidating the strategy containing an appropriate approach to combat cyber threats given the level of complexity of business and acceptable levels of risk," the Reserve Bank of India said in a notification to all commercial banks.
 
"It is essential to enhance the resilience of the banking system by improving the current defences in addressing cyber risks," it said.
 
The central bank asked all scheduled commercial banks to specify potential risks as "low, moderate, high and very high" and said they must report all "unusual cyber-security incidents" to the RBI.
 
It also said the new cyber security policy should be separate from the bank's broader information technology policy.
 
"The number, frequency and impact of cyber incidents/attacks have increased manifold in the recent past, more so in the case of financial sector including banks, underlining the urgent need to put in place a robust cyber security/resilience framework at banks and to ensure adequate cyber-security preparedness among banks on a continuous basis," the notification said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

Shirish Sadanand Shanbhag

8 months ago

In the era where cyber security norms are greatly available, Govt. of India & RBI should form proper norms for cyber security of Bank Business in our country.

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