Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Arunachal to soon produce amber-coloured wine from kiwi fruit
 Reds and whites have been around for ages. Now comes an amber one. Fresh and crisp and high on aroma, Arun Kiwi is a wine that Arunachal Pradesh can truly be proud of as it will soon start producing the drink.
 
Not too long ago, being India's largest producer of the kiwi fruit, the northeastern state found itself in a dilemma as to how to make the best use of it. It was then the idea of making wine out of the fruit dawned on the authorities of the land of the dawn-lit mountains.
 
"Since we had a problem in marketing the hugely abundant produce, we thought of making wine out of it," Egam Basar, head of the state Horticulture Research and Development Institute, told this visiting IANS correspondent.
 
The government then invited Pune-based Hill Crest Food and Beverages to come and check the possibility of kiwi wine.
 
The two sides signed a memorandum of understanding in December 2013 and Arun Kiwi, India's first kiwi wine brand, saw the light of the day in May.
 
The wine is not yet being sold here commercially here but has become a huge hit in Maharashtra, according to Basar.
 
The state government has decided to set up wineries here to and become India's newest wine-producing state.
 
"After Arun Kiwi was launched, the Arunachal Pradesh government decided that wineries should be set up in the state to generate employment and entrepreneurship among youth," said Basar, who is also mission director of the Arunachal Pradesh Horticulture Research and Development Mission.
 
Given that the fruit is delicate and difficult to transport, it makes sense to set up wineries in the state itself. And so, in order to attract investors, the state government has drawn up a wine industry policy after experts went through similar policies of Karnataka and Maharashtra.
 
"The policy envisages a single window clearance for issuing licences and providing electricity and water supply for setting up wineries and also granting tax exemption for 10 years. The policy treats wine as a food processing industry," Basar explained.
 
Apart from various types of kiwis that grow in the wild, the state grows four main varieties - Monty, Hayward, Bruno and Allison. The fruit is mostly grown in the state's West Kameng and Lower Subansiri districts. 
 
With 1,500 metres above sea level being the ideal altitude to grow the kiwi, a hectare of land can produce six to nine tonnes of the fruit annually.
 
"Around 5,000 metric tonnes of the fruit are grown in around 4,000 hectares of land. Since much of this is new land, it will take at least five years for production to reach its full potential," Basar said. 
 
According to him, kiwi is anti-oxidant, is rich in vitamin C and has a lot of minerals. "Kiwi is a perennial fruit and grows throughout the year. Harvesting is done around October-November," Basar said.
 
After having got GI registration for the variety of orange called Mandarin, the state is now set to apply for GI registration of Monty, Hayward, Bruno and Allison kiwis.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Maggi noodles safe, lab tests clear all samples: Nestle
Nestle India said on Friday that 100 percent of the Maggi instant noodles' samples tested in three laboratories have been cleared and that the noodles are safe for human consumption.
 
Armed with these reports, the Indian arm of the Swiss multinational food giant plans to resume soon the production of Maggi noodles that were banned last June amid concerns over high lead and monosodium glutamate (MSG) content.
 
In a statement, Nestle said the results have been received from all three labs mandated by the Bombay High Court to test samples of noodles manufactured by the company.
 
"All 90 samples, covering six variants, tested by the three laboratories, are clear, with lead much below the permissible limits," the Nestle statement added.
 
The company assured it would continue to collaborate with the Indian food regulator, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), and other stakeholders on the issue.
 
"In compliance with the Bombay High Court orders, we will now commence manufacture and will begin selling only after the newly manufactured products are also cleared by the three designated laboratories. We are committed to reintroduce our Maggi noodles (in the Indian market) at the earliest," Nestle said.
 
In the past few months, Nestle conducted around 3,500 tests representing 200 million packs in national and international accredited laboratories and all reports were clear.
 
Besides, tests in several other countries like the US, Britain, Australia and Singapore also found Maggi noodles manufactured in India safe for human consumption.
 
In June, the FSSAI ordered a nationwide ban on the company's noodles on the ground that these were "unsafe and hazardous" for human consumption due to presence of lead allegedly beyond permissible limits. 
 
The MNC withdrew its instant noodles from the Indian market as a result and moved the Bombay High Court against the FSSAI ban.
 
A division bench comprising Justices V.M. Kanade and B.P. Colabawalla in August set aside the June 5 order of the FSSAI and also quashed an order of Maharashtra's Food and Drugs Administration banning production and sale of Maggi noodles in India and the state.
 
The court, however, ordered fresh test on Maggi noodles' samples at three independent labs across India.
 
Nestle India was directed to send five samples of each variant to accredited labs in Punjab, Hyderabad and Jaipur and asked the labs to give reports within six weeks.
 
The consumer affairs ministry filed a class action suit against Nestle India, seeking about Rs.640 crore in damages for alleged unfair trade practices, false labelling and misleading advertisements.
 
It was for the first time that the ministry dragged a company to the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC) under the Consumer Protection Act.
 
However, the apex consumer court on Thursday ordered fresh tests on 13 samples of Maggi noodles from nine batches to determine lead and "MSG stock glutamate" content.
 
Nestle India on September 30 said that due to the ban, over 9,000 suppliers of Maggi noodles had gone out of business. Over 10,000-12,000 distributors also lost their livelihood. The company said it wished to resolve the matter as soon as possible and was "not interested in delaying it".
 
Suresh Narayanan, the India chief of the company, earlier said the "focus of the company is to get Nestle back on the shelves" and added that the "controversy had cast a shadow over Nestle's portfolio".
 
Narayanan told the media that the multinational company was targeting to get the product into the Indian market by the year-end.
 
Meanwhile, the shares of Nestle India rose by 5.6 percent to Rs.6,555, the biggest gain since August 5. The shares had plunged after FSSAI's recall order which resulted in the company's first ever quarterly loss in more than 15 years.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Now, buy cow dung cakes online
Not only clothes and crackers, you can also buy cow dung online this festive season.
 
Online sellers including big players like Big Basket, Shopclues, Amazon and Homeshop18 have introduced the puja samagri (items used during a puja such as camphor, incense sticks etc) online throughout the year including cow dung cakes, which are used in certain Hindu rituals around Diwali and also in havans.
 
Radhika Aggarwal, co-founder of Shopclues, told IANS, "Connecting with the festive theme, we have ensured that our consumers find a great selection of Indian products at Shopclues, especially around puja and navratras time." 
 
"Our conversion rates have almost doubled up for cow dung cakes during this festive season," she added.
 
While some player sells 24 dung cakes in a package, others offer a package of four or 11. Four cow dung cakes cost around Rs.40 but 24 cost Rs.150 with a huge discount.
 
Cow dung cakes are not easily available in urban areas but thanks to e-commerce, it is just-a-click-away product now.
 
Talking about the response Aggarwal said, "We have received a great response especially from metro cities where such products are not easily available. Our festive themed product portfolio has grown threefold during this season."
 
There are also dedicated sites like Vedic Vaani, ePooja store, PujaSamagri and Wheresmypandit which cater to such requirements of users.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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