Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Arunachal to soon produce amber-coloured wine from kiwi fruit
 Reds and whites have been around for ages. Now comes an amber one. Fresh and crisp and high on aroma, Arun Kiwi is a wine that Arunachal Pradesh can truly be proud of as it will soon start producing the drink.
 
Not too long ago, being India's largest producer of the kiwi fruit, the northeastern state found itself in a dilemma as to how to make the best use of it. It was then the idea of making wine out of the fruit dawned on the authorities of the land of the dawn-lit mountains.
 
"Since we had a problem in marketing the hugely abundant produce, we thought of making wine out of it," Egam Basar, head of the state Horticulture Research and Development Institute, told this visiting IANS correspondent.
 
The government then invited Pune-based Hill Crest Food and Beverages to come and check the possibility of kiwi wine.
 
The two sides signed a memorandum of understanding in December 2013 and Arun Kiwi, India's first kiwi wine brand, saw the light of the day in May.
 
The wine is not yet being sold here commercially here but has become a huge hit in Maharashtra, according to Basar.
 
The state government has decided to set up wineries here to and become India's newest wine-producing state.
 
"After Arun Kiwi was launched, the Arunachal Pradesh government decided that wineries should be set up in the state to generate employment and entrepreneurship among youth," said Basar, who is also mission director of the Arunachal Pradesh Horticulture Research and Development Mission.
 
Given that the fruit is delicate and difficult to transport, it makes sense to set up wineries in the state itself. And so, in order to attract investors, the state government has drawn up a wine industry policy after experts went through similar policies of Karnataka and Maharashtra.
 
"The policy envisages a single window clearance for issuing licences and providing electricity and water supply for setting up wineries and also granting tax exemption for 10 years. The policy treats wine as a food processing industry," Basar explained.
 
Apart from various types of kiwis that grow in the wild, the state grows four main varieties - Monty, Hayward, Bruno and Allison. The fruit is mostly grown in the state's West Kameng and Lower Subansiri districts. 
 
With 1,500 metres above sea level being the ideal altitude to grow the kiwi, a hectare of land can produce six to nine tonnes of the fruit annually.
 
"Around 5,000 metric tonnes of the fruit are grown in around 4,000 hectares of land. Since much of this is new land, it will take at least five years for production to reach its full potential," Basar said. 
 
According to him, kiwi is anti-oxidant, is rich in vitamin C and has a lot of minerals. "Kiwi is a perennial fruit and grows throughout the year. Harvesting is done around October-November," Basar said.
 
After having got GI registration for the variety of orange called Mandarin, the state is now set to apply for GI registration of Monty, Hayward, Bruno and Allison kiwis.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Facebook soon to roll down dedicated place to watch videos
 In a move to take on video sharing site YouTube, Facebook is testing a new feature that will allow people to go and exclusively discover, watch and share videos that are relevant to them.
 
According to Will Cathcart, vice president (product management) at Facebook, they will be testing a dedicated place on Facebook for people to go to when they exclusively want to watch videos - whether those are videos they have saved for later or videos from friends.
 
It can be accessed by tapping a “Videos” icon at the bottom of the Facebook app on iPhone or in the “Favourites” section on the left-hand side of News Feed on the web.
 
“We will be testing this with a small number of people now, so this isn’t something most people will see on Facebook right away. We look forward to seeing how people use it to discover, watch and share videos with their friends,” Cathcart wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.
 
The company will allow people to watch clips on a floating screen while continuing to scroll through Facebook like people can do on YouTube.
 
In August, Facebook announced that public figures can share live video with their fans via its feature titled Mentions.
 
In addition to helping people find more videos they may be interested in, Facebook knows people sometimes want to multitask while they watch videos.
 
“To make this possible, we are testing a way for people to watch a video in a floating screen while simultaneously multitasking on Facebook,” Cathcart added.
 
Suggested videos is one of the features Facebook has been testing on iPhone.
 
“We are pleased with initial results which show that people who have suggested videos are discovering and watching more new videos,” he wrote.
 
Facebook is also starting suggested videos on the web and plans to test on Android phones in the coming months.
 
“To make it easy to return to the videos you’re interested in, we’ve been testing a button that allows you to save a video to watch later, which can be accessed in your 'Saved' bookmark,” the company posted.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Pulse Beat
Getting Away with Murder!
 
BMJ (British Medical Journal) reports that scientific fraud is rampant and nothing has changed lately to curb it. The respected journal was reporting on the big fraud by a drug major in the United Kingdom, having tentacles in the United States also, about the dangerous side-effects of one of their top selling anti-depressants—Paroxetine—which was known to them, right from day one. That drug may have killed millions by now; but the drug company has been fined a pittance—of $3 billion—while it has made 10 times more profit by selling that drug for years.
 
The argument against ordering closure of the company is that the drug industry will suffer and that will adversely affect the economy. Do I understand that human life is of no consequence compared to corporate profits? Do governments exist to protect their interests at the cost of millions of lives? What sort of message are we sending out to the world? Make money—big money—and you can get away with mass murder!
 
Statins: New Dangers
 
Latest research has thrown fresh light on this darling of Big Pharma and their agents in the guise of doctors.
 
Statins are known to accelerate ageing and damage the DNA and, possibly, shorten the length of the telomeres at both ends of the chromosomes. They, of course, damage the muscle, encourage diabetes in normal human beings to the extent of 10%-47% per year and affect mental functions. Still, friends in my profession refuse to believe that they are not good drugs for human use.
 
Is Schumann Resonance Changing?
 
The Schumann resonance (SR) is the electromagnetic energy encircling this earth derived from the sun’s energy circle. This affects human magnetic energy also—along with that of the earth. This was described to be around 7.8 hertz (beats per second) or so by Indian sages of yore which was reconfirmed by science recently. This is what gives us energy for all our activities. This also affects brain activity by controlling the brain waves. 
 
Lately, Russian receiving stations have been receiving mixed signals of the Schuman resonance frequency going up and also having frequent fluctuations. This is good and bad news. This change will make our cognitive functions better and we will be able to think better; but, at the same time, it might make us jittery and depressed. However, the best part of the whole exercise is that this change might make us wiser about our past and future happenings!
 
Aspirin and Cancer
 
Anew study from the Netherlands claims that aspirin can reduce deaths due to many cancers especially the GI (gastro-intestinal) tract cancers. This is too premature a study and cannot be solely relied on; but one can keep track of many such small studies coming out in the near future.
 
“The study included 13,715 patients who received a GI cancer diagnosis between 1998 and 2011. They were followed up for a median of 48.6 months. Of these patients, 42.8% had colon cancer, 25.4% had rectal cancer and 10.2% had cancer of the oesophagus. To determine how aspirin use after a GI cancer diagnosis impacted the overall survival of these patients, the researchers linked patient data with drug dispensing information from the PHARMO Institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands. In this study we analysed each separate prescription per patient, and therefore we were able to achieve a more exact estimate of the effect of aspirin on cancer survival,” notes Dr Martine Frouws. Usually, such studies are funded by drug companies. Researchers have to deliver positive results when they claim large sums of money as research grants. 
 
Has science become a money-spinner? Researchers help drug companies with positive studies and governments help them by condoning dangerous drugs from being released into the market with prior knowledge of their side-effects which are blinded from the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). The poor patient is at the receiving end.

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