Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Artificial sweeteners can make you actually eat more
Researchers have identified a complex network in the brain that has revealed why artificial sweeteners may not be the best way to slim down.
 
Artificial sweeteners are substitutes for sugar that provides a sweet taste like that of sugar while containing significantly less food energy.
 
According to the researchers, the brain system responds to artificially sweetened food by telling the animal it hasn't eaten enough energy, thus increasing the appetite and prompting them to actually eat more.
 
It senses and integrates the sweetness and energy content of food, said the study conducted on mice and fruit flies.
 
"After chronic exposure to a diet that contained the artificial sweetener sucralose, we saw that animals began eating a lot more," said lead researcher Greg Neely, Associate Professor at the University of Sydney in Australia.
 
"Artificial sweeteners can actually change how animals perceive the sweetness of their food, with a discrepancy between sweetness and energy levels prompting an increase in caloric consumption," Neely added.
 
The findings showed that inside the brain's reward centres, sweet sensation is integrated with energy content. When sweetness versus energy is out of balance for a period of time, the brain recalibrates and increases total calories consumed.
 
For the study, fruit flies were exposed to a diet laced with artificial sweetener for prolonged periods (more than five days). The flies were then found to consume 30% more calories when they were then given naturally sweetened food.
 
The team also replicated the study using mice. The mice that consumed a sucralose-sweetened diet for seven days displayed a significant increase in food consumption, and the neuronal pathway involved was the same as in the fruit flies.
 
"The chronic consumption of the artificial sweetener actually increases the sweet intensity of real nutritive sugar which then increases the animal's overall motivation to eat more food," Neely stated in the work published in the journal Cell Metabolism.
 
Further, the artificial sweeteners were also found to promote hyperactivity, insomnia as well as decrease the sleep quality - behaviours consistent with a mild starvation or fasting state.
 
"The pathway discovered is part of a conserved starvation response that actually makes nutritious food taste better when you are starving," Neely noted.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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Pokemon Go raises users' security, safety concerns
The newly-launched augmented reality (AR) game Pokemon Go poses a great data security threat to users as the app gets "full access" to their Google account, allowing the gaming company to read all emails, a new report said on Wednesday.
 
According to security software company Trend Micro, for some users of iPhones, signing into the game with the most convenient option -- using your Google account -- allows the gaming company to read your emails. 
 
"Other risks this game exposes are physical risks to actual life and limb," the report said.
 
While enjoying the game, the user is exposed to many threats and introduces whole new categories of life risks.
 
Firstly, Pokemon Go's real-world gameplay has been linked to armed robberies as criminals have used the game to locate and lure intended targets. 
 
Secondly, there are reports of trespassing as enthusiastic players try to "find" and "capture" creatures on others' property. In the US, gamers trespassing on others' property face a real threat of physical harm from property owners who may use force to protect their property. 
 
"And of course, there's the risk of injury or death from not paying attention to your surroundings as you play the game," the report added.
 
Thirdly, the users can meet an accident while they are indulged in gaming. 
 
The game requires users' full attention immediately to the exclusion of all else. 
 
Although, there is a warning each time you start the game to be sure to pay attention but that warning is quickly overlooked.
 
In the US, where the game is very popular, police departments and safety agencies have warned players of Pokemon Go to stay safe and alert as hysteria over the popular mobile game swells.
 
Since launch, the game has topped 7.5 million downloads and pulled in an average of $1.6 million a day in revenue, according to estimates from research firm SensorTower.
 
"Agencies have urged players to stay aware of their surroundings and be careful," USA Today reported.
 
This is how the game works.
 
It uses the GPS capabilities of your device in conjunction with Google Maps to "place" creatures in real world locations, which you then try to find them using your device as a guide. 
 
Once you are in proximity to the "placed" creature, you then use your device's camera to "view" the creature and try to "capture" it. 
 
"This works with you using your device as a viewer to 'see' the creature near you by looking at an image from the camera with the creature superimposed on it. You then 'capture' the creature for points by throwing Poké Balls at it on the device's screen," Trend Micro stated.
 
The Pokemon Go is available on Google Playstore and Apple's App Store in the US, Japan and Australia, Philippines, New Zealand and is coming soon in India, Singapore, Germany, Taiwan, Indonesia and Britain.
 
However, a mirror file is available on the internet and people in India are already downloading the game from insecured sources. 
 
The Pokemon Go Plus device which is a wrist watch will be available in August, informed apkqueen.com, the website which is providing link to download the game.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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News outlets worried about employees' use of Facebook, Twitter
Big news organisations who first embraced social media use at workplace are now seeing more risks than benefits in employees' use of Facebook and Twitter, reveals an interesting study.
 
Realising the risks of social media, major news organisations have created guidelines for employees on how to use these outlets, separate from the companies' existing codes of conduct.
 
Jayeon Lee, assistant professor of journalism at Pennsylvania-based Lehigh University, found that news organisations are more concerned about the current social media environment than excited about it at least when it comes to their employees.
 
“I was wondering what approaches news organisations take when it comes to their own employees' social media uses," Lee said.
 
“In particular, knowing both positive and negative implications of journalists' social media uses, I wanted to see if their guidelines were dominantly positive, negative, or neutral in their framing of the implications,” she added.
 
Overall, Lee found that the guidelines focus primarily on the risks and challenges presented by the use of social media rather than the opportunities and advantages for media.
 
"As some media critics point out, overreaching rules can stifle creativity and morale and even discourage overall social media use itself," she explained in a paper set to be published in the journal The Communication Review.
 
The study looked at eight US news organisations - The New York Times, The Associated Press, Bloomberg, Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, CNN, and NPR - and three British news outlets - BBC, The Times and The Daily Telegraph.
 
According to the findings, news organisations are most concerned about: accuracy, breaking objectivity, inappropriate online behaviours and harming their principles and credibility.
 
Accuracy - sourcing or redistributing false information from social media without sufficient fact verification - was the most frequently raised topic and accounted for 17.8% of the total sentences studied.
 
“The results show that the prevention-focused approach is more common than I would have predicted," Lee said.
 
"Although I expected that the guidelines would include various warnings related to risky social media activities, I was surprised to find little comment about how to use social media wisely or effectively to derive full benefit from it,” she commented.
 
Lee recognised that news organizations are actively utilizing various social media to reach a wider audience and build brand loyalty.
 
“However, it seems they are keen on keeping their own employees from actively engaging in social media,” she added.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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