Citizens' Issues
Android malware doubled in 2015: Report
New Delhi : Smartphone security is the new concern as cases of Android malware were reported to have doubled in 2015 as compared to 2014, said a new report which warned that, in 2016, more hacks on smart technologies could result in fatal privacy damage.
 
The annual security report from security software company Trend Micro Inc. also noted that the rise in Android malware is owing to the aggressive adoption of smart technologies.
 
"Android's 'MediaServer' component took a lot of hits in 2015. Vulnerabilities found in the component can be exploited to perform attacks using arbitrary code execution. Such attacks could force a device's system to go on endless reboot, draining its battery," Trend Micro said in a statement.
 
The hacks can render Android devices silent and unable to make calls due to unresponsive screens, constant rebooting, making the device totally useless.
 
Some other Android vulnerabilities include the susceptibility of the Android debugger Debuggered that can expose a device's memory content. 
 
The Samsung SwiftKey Keyboard vulnerability had a pre-loaded malicious code masquerading as additional language packs that put over 600 million Samsung Galaxy-series phones at risk. 
 
With the emergence of vulnerabilities like iOS Quicksand and AirDrop, even Apple's phones took some hits in 2015. These proved that iOS users could potentially be hit with malware. 
 
Although there are no current solutions designed to protect Internet of Things (IoT), the report suggested that in order to keep devices protected from attacks, developers need to be able to push regular updates and patches to close off any holes attackers can exploit.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Asia likely to face severe water crisis by 2050: Study
New York : the continent that houses roughly half the world's population, will face a "high risk of severe water stress" by 2050 if the current environmental, economical and population growth persists, warns a new study.
 
The study points out that water shortages are not simply the results of climate change and environmental stress. 
 
"It's not just a climate change issue. We simply cannot ignore that economic and population growth in society can have a very strong influence on our demand for resources and how we manage them," said one of the researchers Adam Schlosser, a senior research scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in US.
 
"And climate, on top of that, can lead to substantial magnifications to those stresses," Schlosser added.
 
The findings, published in the journal PLOS One, showed that the median amounts of projected growth and climate change in the next 35 years in Asia would lead to about 1 billion more people becoming "water-stressed" compared to the present time.
 
To conduct the study, the scientists built upon an existing model developed previously at MIT, the Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM), which contains probabilistic projections of population growth, economic expansion, climate, and carbon emissions from human activity. 
 
They then linked the IGSM model to detailed models of water use for a large portion of Asia encompassing China, India, and many smaller nations.
 
The scientists then ran an extensive series of repeated projections using varying conditions. 
 
In what they call the "just growth" scenario, they held climate conditions constant and evaluated the effects of economic and population growth on the water supply. 
 
In an alternate "just climate" scenario, the scientists held growth constant and evaluated climate-change effects alone. And in a "climate and growth" scenario, they studied the impact of rising economic activity, growing populations, and climate change.
 
The study gave the researchers a "unique ability to tease out the human (economic) and environmental" factors leading to water shortages and to assess their relative significance, Schlosser said.
 
The IGSM model also allowed the team to look at how, under the same variables, scenarios change according to countries. This is particularly useful to come up with country-specific strategies, in order to avoid water stress.
 
"For China, it looks like industrial growth (has the greatest impact) as people get wealthier. In India, population growth has a huge effect. It varies by region," explained lead author Charle Fant, researcher at MIT.
 
Other variables, such as water supply networks into and out of the different areas, and the way population is distributed around said supplies should be examined, the researchers said. 
 
"We are assessing the extent to which climate mitigation and adaptation practices - such as more efficient irrigation technologies - can reduce the future risk of nations under high water stress," Schlosser said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Alphabet of disability: C for Candoco, D for Dance
New Delhi : This might not be your regular contemporary show where dancers swirl in the air with fluid movements. Here, performers may be wheel-chair bound with well co-ordinated movements in sync with their partners.
 
Welcome to Candoco, UK's professional dance company that integrates physically challenged and other dancers.
 
Disability is not an impediment for Dan Dawn, a dancer with Candoco, who performed in the capital with Mirjam Gurtner, his stage partner for years, to a full house at British Council on Wednesday late evening. 
 
"Dance is everything for me. It's a challenge, its art, politics, and it's a special place for me," says Dawn, who joined the company five years ago.
 
The duo, who performed the act 'Studies for C' composed by award-winning choreographer Javier de Frutos, say that their focus is on creating a bold work rather than pitching on the disability quotient.
 
"Our philosophy is to create bold and excellent art. That's our focus and it's not about abled or disabled. Our dance is about celebration of bodies. Our bodies work in different ways to create a level playing field," says Gurtner, who dons the roles of a performer, choreographer and rehearsal director.
 
The act, inspired by Tennessee Williams' play 'Camino Real' and Samuel Beckett's 'Waiting for Godot', depicts a couple trapped in a stagnating relationship. Narrating the theme, Dawn says, "the couple is unable to escape the domestic world because their reliance on each other has become strong. It's about how they deal with the situation."
 
Dawn finds the Indian audience both encouraging and sensitive. The company has made pit stops in Kolkata and Chennai earlier this month as part of its Indian tour, marking its 25th year celebrations.
 
Set to traditional Mexican ranchera music by Lila Downs, the performances take place in an intimate domestic world in which the use of Mexican wrestling masks suggests the deeper, darker forces at work.
 
"The connotation is that when two people stay together in a place for a long time, there is bound to be conflict and the mask is the metaphor in the show," said Dawn.
 
The costumes, designed by de Frutos, feature the writings of Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, who famously said, "I would rather die on my feet than live on my knees."
 
Ask the duo how they find a level playing ground, and Gurtner says, "We made peace four years ago. It's a privilege to work together for long years. We have developed a relationship on stage and we have learned a lot from each other. It's about deeply connecting with your partner in movements in the stage."
 
The core philosophy of the company founded by contemporary dancer Celeste Dandekar 25 years ago, is in inclusiveness, says Gurtner.
 
"Dandekar had a fall while performing in a stage, resulting in a spinal injury. It prevented her from dancing until choreographer Darshan Singh Buller persuaded her to dance again, albeit from her wheelchair. In 1991, she founded Candoco to integrate both physically challenged and others".
 
Collaboration is the watch word for the company, says Gurtner.
 
"We have internationally famous choreographers. and they bring specific movements to company. It's about each dancer finding their way of working with their body in that manner. Here, artists also have the freedom to improvise. It's a collaborative process," she says, adding that dance opens the door to understand the world.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Online Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine)