Citizens' Issues
Andhra minister shifts exam centre for son’s wedding reception!

This is not the first time, Dharmana Prasada Rao, minister for roads and buildings in Andhra Pradesh, has intimidated people from Srikakulam district, and yet there is no action

In a shocking incident, Dharmana Prasada Rao, minister for roads and buildings in Andhra Pradesh has allegedly shifted an exam centre in Srikakulam from a school to accommodate his son Ravi Manohar Naidu's wedding reception. The sudden change of venue for exam put several students in the dock and in the rush for reaching the new centre, one of the students met with a serious accident that also killed her father.

EAS Sarma, former secretary of the Government of India, in a letter written to Kiran Kumar Reddy, chief minister of Andhra Pradesh, has said that the minister should be brought to the books. "In any civilized society, such persons would have been brought to the book straightaway. A public representative would have been sacked without any hesitation from the sacred office he is in occupation of. It is only in a banana state that encourages feudal tyranny that such persons are allowed to continue and flaunt their authority to threaten the common people," he said in the letter.

Surprisingly, the incident found mention only in one place, that too when the Student's Federation of India (SFI) took out a massive rally in Srikakulam in protest of shifting of the exam centre. According to the news published by HansIndia.info, students who took part in the rally vented their ire on the officials for shifting the government degree college centre to facilitate wedding reception of Ravi Manohar Naidu, the minister's son.
 
On Sunday, the state government held an examination at 384 centres for recruiting 1,172 village revenue officers (VROs) and 6,063 village revenue assistants (VRAs), in the revenues department. The results would be announced on 12 March 2012 and the appointment letters would be handed over on 24th March.
 
But this is not the first time, Mr Rao, has been named. Last week, Telugu Desam Party (TDP) chief N Chandrababu Naidu, in an open letter to the chief minister, has said that remand report from the Anti-Corruption Bureau (ACB), mentioned that Rs40 lakh was paid in bribes to the personal assistant of roads and buildings minister DP Rao as well as his close relatives in Srikakulam district.

The ACB raids on liquor syndicates in different parts of Andhra Pradesh have  exposed the nexus between traders, excise officials, police, ministers, legislators and leaders of the ruling Congress. "It has been established that 12 members of parliament (MPs) and 70 members of legislative assembly (MLAs) and members of legislative council (MLCs) have links with the liquor mafia. The sixth page in the ACB remand report has been mysteriously removed as it would fully expose everyone," Mr Naidu alleged.

Mr Rao, the roads and buildings minister has also been accused of felling a compound wall of a school, threatening everyone who is against him. "Some days ago, the same minister, for a similar event, did not hesitate to break down the compound wall of a school and damage the precincts, without either the district authorities or the state education department resisting it. In the recent past, this very same person had thrown a veiled threat against all those that disagree with him on matters of public policy, committing an act of indiscretion that is condemnable," wrote Mr Sarma in his letter.

He added, "Of late, we have witnessed the same minister's involvement in the allotment of a valuable granite mine to his son in the same district. In another district, his son has got a valuable apartment for a song in return for the favours shown to the building developer who has misappropriated the land on the basis of fabricated documents."

The former secretary asked Andhra Pradesh chief minister to ascertain the facts and if the facts as reported are true, then ask Mr Rao to quit.

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COMMENTS

C Jyoti

5 years ago

Can I reproduce, for the sake of your readers, a piece created by a friend, apposite in this context"? It is as follows:



The classical models of governance are:

Democracy: Government by the people, of the people, for the people.

Monarchy: Government by a single ruler (king/queen, emperor)

Aristocracy: Government by noblemen (hereditary)

Oligarchy: Government by few persons

Theocracy: Government by God (in reality this means government by religious leaders)

Dictatorship: Government by people, that have seized power by force (often: military dictatorship)

We have a government which does not fit any of the above classifications, even though our politicians and commentators keep calling it a democracy.

Once in five years the people go to vote and elect their leaders. After that they have no say in how these representatives treat the people or the country. It is like getting married and finding out that your spouse is free to be as adulterous as he or she wishes, and you cannot even divorce him or her.There is no right to recall.

People do not have any referendum where they can say whether any planned legislation is to their liking or not.

The choice of who to elect, in practice, is limited by the money and influence of the political parties. 156 Parliamentarians have serious criminal cases going on against them. Some are in jail. Many others deserve to be. Often governments are saved by bribing MPs.

Given the above, ours is definitely not government by the people.

After the elections, the elected representatives are not of the people any more. They vote themselves massive pay raises, making them immune to inflation, travel in luxury cars with red lights on them, have a very high level of security, eat highly subsidised food in the Parliament canteen, enjoy VIP medical care, almost unlimited free travel and so on. No, our elected representatives are definitely not of the people.

Is our governance for the people? After over six decades of such governance, there is virtually no public transport system in the villages. Medical care, if it exists, is rudimentary. Roads are a disgrace. Inflation rages uncontrolled. Terrorists strike at will. Open and overflowing sewers, even in urban areas are an invitation to dengue, malaria and worse. No, our government is not for the people.

When our government is not by the people, of the people or for the people, how can we call it a democracy in the classical sense? No we are not a democracy. Equally, we are not a dictatorship, monarchy, theocracy, oligarchy or aristocracy. What are we then?

I recently came across a word which precisely defines our government system. We are a kleptocracy. The word is defined below:

PRONUNCIATION:
(klep-TOK-ruh-see)

MEANING:
noun: A government by the corrupt in which rulers use their official positions for personal gain.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek klepto-, from kleptes (thief) + -cracy (rule).

We are indeed a Kleptocracy. If the people want to make us into a democracy, we have to act now. Anna Hazare has shown the way. Even if we do not agree with everything he says, we need to sit back and introspect and then find a better way to bring about this transformation. If we have nothing better to offer, let us stop criticizing Anna Hazare and his team and do our part in improving India. If we have something better to offer, let us offer it and prove that it is indeed better. Let us just not be armchair critics.

C Jyoti

5 years ago

Can I reproduce, for the sake of your readers, a piece created by a friend, apposite in this context"? It is as follows:



The classical models of governance are:

Democracy: Government by the people, of the people, for the people.

Monarchy: Government by a single ruler (king/queen, emperor)

Aristocracy: Government by noblemen (hereditary)

Oligarchy: Government by few persons

Theocracy: Government by God (in reality this means government by religious leaders)

Dictatorship: Government by people, that have seized power by force (often: military dictatorship)

We have a government which does not fit any of the above classifications, even though our politicians and commentators keep calling it a democracy.

Once in five years the people go to vote and elect their leaders. After that they have no say in how these representatives treat the people or the country. It is like getting married and finding out that your spouse is free to be as adulterous as he or she wishes, and you cannot even divorce him or her.There is no right to recall.

People do not have any referendum where they can say whether any planned legislation is to their liking or not.

The choice of who to elect, in practice, is limited by the money and influence of the political parties. 156 Parliamentarians have serious criminal cases going on against them. Some are in jail. Many others deserve to be. Often governments are saved by bribing MPs.

Given the above, ours is definitely not government by the people.

After the elections, the elected representatives are not of the people any more. They vote themselves massive pay raises, making them immune to inflation, travel in luxury cars with red lights on them, have a very high level of security, eat highly subsidised food in the Parliament canteen, enjoy VIP medical care, almost unlimited free travel and so on. No, our elected representatives are definitely not of the people.

Is our governance for the people? After over six decades of such governance, there is virtually no public transport system in the villages. Medical care, if it exists, is rudimentary. Roads are a disgrace. Inflation rages uncontrolled. Terrorists strike at will. Open and overflowing sewers, even in urban areas are an invitation to dengue, malaria and worse. No, our government is not for the people.

When our government is not by the people, of the people or for the people, how can we call it a democracy in the classical sense? No we are not a democracy. Equally, we are not a dictatorship, monarchy, theocracy, oligarchy or aristocracy. What are we then?

I recently came across a word which precisely defines our government system. We are a kleptocracy. The word is defined below:

PRONUNCIATION:
(klep-TOK-ruh-see)

MEANING:
noun: A government by the corrupt in which rulers use their official positions for personal gain.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek klepto-, from kleptes (thief) + -cracy (rule).

We are indeed a Kleptocracy. If the people want to make us into a democracy, we have to act now. Anna Hazare has shown the way. Even if we do not agree with everything he says, we need to sit back and introspect and then find a better way to bring about this transformation. If we have nothing better to offer, let us stop criticizing Anna Hazare and his team and do our part in improving India. If we have something better to offer, let us offer it and prove that it is indeed better. Let us just not be armchair critics.

CJyoti

5 years ago

Can I reproduce, for the sake of your readers, a piece created by a friend, apposite in this context"? It is as follows:



The classical models of governance are:

Democracy: Government by the people, of the people, for the people.

Monarchy: Government by a single ruler (king/queen, emperor)

Aristocracy: Government by noblemen (hereditary)

Oligarchy: Government by few persons

Theocracy: Government by God (in reality this means government by religious leaders)

Dictatorship: Government by people, that have seized power by force (often: military dictatorship)

We have a government which does not fit any of the above classifications, even though our politicians and commentators keep calling it a democracy.

Once in five years the people go to vote and elect their leaders. After that they have no say in how these representatives treat the people or the country. It is like getting married and finding out that your spouse is free to be as adulterous as he or she wishes, and you cannot even divorce him or her.There is no right to recall.

People do not have any referendum where they can say whether any planned legislation is to their liking or not.

The choice of who to elect, in practice, is limited by the money and influence of the political parties. 156 Parliamentarians have serious criminal cases going on against them. Some are in jail. Many others deserve to be. Often governments are saved by bribing MPs.

Given the above, ours is definitely not government by the people.

After the elections, the elected representatives are not of the people any more. They vote themselves massive pay raises, making them immune to inflation, travel in luxury cars with red lights on them, have a very high level of security, eat highly subsidised food in the Parliament canteen, enjoy VIP medical care, almost unlimited free travel and so on. No, our elected representatives are definitely not of the people.

Is our governance for the people? After over six decades of such governance, there is virtually no public transport system in the villages. Medical care, if it exists, is rudimentary. Roads are a disgrace. Inflation rages uncontrolled. Terrorists strike at will. Open and overflowing sewers, even in urban areas are an invitation to dengue, malaria and worse. No, our government is not for the people.

When our government is not by the people, of the people or for the people, how can we call it a democracy in the classical sense? No we are not a democracy. Equally, we are not a dictatorship, monarchy, theocracy, oligarchy or aristocracy. What are we then?

I recently came across a word which precisely defines our government system. We are a kleptocracy. The word is defined below:

PRONUNCIATION:
(klep-TOK-ruh-see)

MEANING:
noun: A government by the corrupt in which rulers use their official positions for personal gain.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek klepto-, from kleptes (thief) + -cracy (rule).

We are indeed a Kleptocracy. If the people want to make us into a democracy, we have to act now. Anna Hazare has shown the way. Even if we do not agree with everything he says, we need to sit back and introspect and then find a better way to bring about this transformation. If we have nothing better to offer, let us stop criticizing Anna Hazare and his team and do our part in improving India. If we have something better to offer, let us offer it and prove that it is indeed better. Let us just not be armchair critics.

Nagesh Kini FCA

5 years ago

Yet another case of goons enjoying seats of power and getting away.With so much of illegalities the Congress High Command ought to get him to quit.

REPLY

AB

In Reply to Nagesh Kini FCA 5 years ago

If I deem something as my father's property, my fiefdom and I deem the people all around as my serfs, I have every right, in a popular democracy managed by the power of barrels of unlicensed guns, to do whatever I want and like. And, in addition, my state-sponsored team of bodyguards shall also have the right to kill anyone anytime and force people to remove their clothes and shoes before attending my public appearances. All are equal in democracy, some only are much more equal than the others. And, not for the likes of me will there be any rule of law!

GIPL develops smart phone based surveillance, tracking system

“It can be run on a windows operated mobile phone to identify exact location of the trouble prone areas in dense forests,” GIPL CEO Vijay Sharma said

A software-based system for smart phone enabled surveillance and tracking has been developed by the state-run Gujarat Info Petro which will find diverse applications in sectors like forest and agriculture.
 
This system will be of great help in conservation of endangered species of Asiatic lions in Gir and other flora and fauna found in forests of Gujarat.

"We have developed a unique MIS system on GIS base for surveillance and tracking. It can be run on a windows-operated mobile phone to identify exact location of the trouble prone areas in dense forests," GIPL CEO Vijay Sharma said. "The system which updates the server over the air (OTR), eradicates the need for physical filing of data on a computer, and can also conduct digital surveys of the agricultural fields," he said.

Management Information System (MIS), till now has been confined to laptop and desktop usage. It is widely used by the industry as an ERP solution, for effectively managing the organisations. Superimposing, MIS data on Geographic Information System (GIS), for quick referencing had been a challenge so far for the ICT sector.

"A forest beat guard armed with such a software-driven mobile phone can help check acts of poaching, fire, tree cutting, encroachments on forest land, by clicking a picture of the site and sending it through SMS to the server," he said. "The moment a picture (with the location, longitude and latitude) lands on the server an alert is generated to the concerned person and rescue teams can be rushed to the exact spot in very short time," Mr Sharma said, explaining how the system operates. "Using the GPS feature the location of forest beat guard can also be tracked, through PDA (smart phone) based mobile surveillance system, so that the forest department can keep an eye on whether they are performing their duties or not," Mr Sharma said.

GIPL, is a wholly owned subsidiary of the state run Gujarat State Petroleum Corporation (GSPC). The company has developed the technology for Gujarat Forest Department. The company is in the process of developing a system based on similar technology for the Gujarat Seed Certificate Corporation that would help in conducting surveys of the agricultural fields.

"We are developing a system for the state Seed Certificate Corporation that would help in surveying the field area and also help estimate its potential yield," Mr Sharma said.

The project has been supported by the Gujarat's Forest Department.

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CRISIL’s annual net profit at Rs186.51 crore in FY11

CRISIL posted a net profit of Rs50.56 crore for the quarter ended 31 December 2011 as compared to Rs45.72 crore for the quarter ended 31 December 2010.

Ratings agency CRISIL has announced its results for the quarter and year ended 31 December 2011. The company has posted a net profit of Rs50.56 crore for the quarter ended 31 December 2011 as compared to Rs45.72 crore for the quarter ended 31 December 2010. Total Income has increased from Rs151.07 crore for the quarter ended 31 December 2010 to Rs185.90 crore for the quarter ended 31 December 2011.

The company has posted a net profit of Rs186.51 crore for the year ended 31 December 2011 as compared to Rs195.75 crore for the year ended 31 December 2010. Total Income has increased from Rs602.33 crore for the year ended 31 December 2010 to Rs682.17 crore for the year ended 31 December 2011.

The directors have recommended payment of final dividend of Rs2.75 per share. During the year, CRISIL returned Rs157.09 crore to shareholders through a dividend payout of Rs77.82 crore and a share buyback of Rs79.27 crore. CRISIL also sub-divided its equity shares, from a nominal value of Rs10 per share to Re1 per share.

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