World
Alberto Salazar Disputes Allegations — Some of Which Were Never Made
In a lengthy response to stories by ProPublica and the BBC, Salazar addresses the allegations of former athletes and staff that he broke drug rules
 
Three weeks after ProPublica and the BBC reported allegations that Alberto Salazar, the iconic coach of the Nike Oregon Project, had experimented with testosterone and broken drug rules, Salazar posted a detailed, two-part response on the group’s website. 
 
Salazar disputed several allegations that were not made in the stories, or inaccurately described allegations that were. He also confirmed others, admitting, for example, he tested testosterone gel on both of his sons. 
 
Salazar said the claims in the ProPublica and BBC stories are based on lies by disgruntled former athletes and employees or misunderstandings of his recommendations or conduct.
 
“I will never permit doping. Oregon Project athletes must fully comply with the WADA Code and IAAF Rules,” Salazar said in the lengthy post. 
 
The three-time winner of the New York City Marathon said he had pushed himself so hard as an athlete that “I still suffer today the negative physical effects of my excessive training … but will not hurt my athletes like I hurt myself.” His athletes, he said, have appropriate documentation for any medications, and he has never helped an athlete gain a medical exemption or prescription they didn’t need. 
 
Salazar reserved particular ire for Steve Magness, a former Oregon Project assistant coach and current head cross-country coach at the University of Houston, who made several of the most contentious allegations. Magness told ProPublica and the BBC that he left the Oregon Project in 2012 by mutual agreement with Salazar after he became disillusioned with the coach’s approach to medicine. 
 
In his response, Salazar said “Magness did not leave the Oregon Project. The Oregon Project terminated his contract in 2012.” 
 
Prior to the publication of the initial stories, Magness provided ProPublica and the BBC with a “Mutual Termination of Contract” letter from Nike. The letter, dated June 27, 2012, starts: “Dear Steve, As discussed, both you and NIKE have decided to terminate your NIKE contract … As such, this letter shall acknowledge the mutual decision to terminate the contract, effective immediately.” The short letter ends with: “We would like to thank you for your association with NIKE. Should an opportunity present itself to work together again in the future, NIKE would welcome consideration of such an opportunity.” Emails from Salazar, provided by Magness, express “complete confidence” in him just one month earlier.
 
Yesterday, the Associated Press reported that the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency is investigating Salazar and that “more than a dozen witnesses have been interviewed and USADA is actively pursuing documents and other evidence from Salazar.”
 
Salazar was provided with an extensive list of questions a month prior to the initial ProPublica and BBC stories. He only answered a select group of them.
 
Salazar began today’s rebuttal by addressing an allegation about Salazar’s star athlete, Galen Rupp, that neither ProPublica nor the BBC made: “The claims that Galen has been on prednisone continuously since he was 15 are absolutely false.”
 
ProPublica and the BBC published a document showing that Rupp, who won the silver medal in the 2012 Olympics, had apparently taken prednisone during one time period when he was 16. The story did not report allegations of continuous use nor cite the age 15. 
 
Salazar also said the article falsely reported that Rupp had received therapeutic use exemptions [TUE] by manipulating the TUE system and that he had received “numerous TUEs for multiple different treatments.” TUEs are exemptions that are granted to allow athletes to use otherwise restricted drugs or treatments. No such assertions were made in the story.
 
ProPublica and the BBC gave no accounting of TUEs given to Rupp in an elite running career that spans more than a decade. Salazar stressed that Rupp “has only received two TUEs in his running career since 2010.”
 
Salazar also noted that TUEs “are a rare occurrence in the Oregon Project.” No allegation about the prevalence of TUEs among Oregon Project athletes was made. 
 
One of the most controversial elements of the ProPublica and BBC stories was an allegation that Rupp, Salazar’s longtime star, may have used testosterone while still in high school. Magness provided a photograph of a Nike Lab document that included a 2002 notation by a scientist that said Rupp was…
 
 
Courtesy: ProPublica

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8 Things You Should Know about E-Cigarettes
Beware of these misleading claims
 
1. Unknown risks: While much of the marketing of e-cigarettes has centered around the claim that vaping products are a safer alternative to tobacco cigarettes, the jury is still out on that. In fact, California recently became the first state in the nation to issue a health warning about their “toxicity” and advised residents not to smoke them. The FDA, which will be issuing new regulations surrounding e-cigarettes, maintains that the risks associated with e-cigarettes have not been fully studied. At issue is the nicotine in the products and the chemicals in the vapor that is emitted. 
 
2. Potentially poisonous liquid: A study by the Centers for Disease Control found that the number of calls to poison centers regarding liquids containing nicotine used in e-cigarettes is dramatically rising. More than half involved children under 5 and 42 percent involved consumers aged 20 and over. “The report shows that e-cigarette liquids containing nicotine have the potential to cause immediate adverse health effects and represent an emerging public health concern,” the CDC said. Callers reported vomiting, nausea and eye irritation. https://www.truthinadvertising.org/seven-things-know-e-cigarettes/njoylarge/
 
3. Court challenges: Several e-cigarette companies have been hit with lawsuits alleging deceptive advertising claims, including one major e-cigarette manufacturer in the U.S., Njoy. The suit, filed by a California consumer, alleges that the Arizona-based company uses deceptive tactics to market its products as safe though the e-cigarettes contain some of the same carcinogens found in traditional cigarettes.
 
4. Marketing to kids: Though the FDA said it will extend agency oversight to e-cigarettes, the products are not bound by the same advertising restrictions that regular tobacco cigarettes must follow. Concerned that companies are taking advantage of this, U.S. Senators have introduced legislation to ban the marketing of e-cigarettes — which come in a variety of flavors, such as grape and bubble gum, and have been endorsed by such stars as Bruno Mars and Jenny McCarthy — to children. A recent FDA report found that while the number of kids smoking traditional tobacco cigarettes is down, the number using other tobacco products such as e-cigarettes has risen dramatically. In 2014, the number of children trying e-cigarettes for the first time surpassed the number of children using any other type of tobacco product, according to the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) conducted by the CDC and FDA. The FDA said while e-cigarettes don’t contain tobacco, “research has clearly demonstrated that exposure to nicotine at a young age increases the chance that kids will become addicted.”
 
5. Scams: E-cigarette companies are out in force – proliferating especially on the Internet — trying to capitalize on consumer interest, some offering free trials and special deals. But many of these special deals are not deals at all and hundreds of consumers say they’ve gotten ripped off, with companies repeatedly charging their credit cards and wiping out their bank accounts. Federal officials have received more than 600 complaints from consumers about scams involving e-cigarette companies.
 
6. Smoking cessation claims: Any product claiming to be a smoking-cessation device must have approval from the FDA and the FDA has not yet issued any guidance or regulation on what constitutes e-cigarettes and “therapeutic” claims. So be wary.
 
7. Bans on e-cigarettes: And while we are talking about claims to be wary of, add this to the list. Though many e-cigarette marketers say the products can be smoked anywhere, which may have been true at one point, it’s not anymore. Dozens of local municipalities, big cities and states are banning their use in public areas. Hawaii has banned e-cigarette and tobacco cigarette sales to minors.
 
8. Europe takes strong steps: The European Parliament approved a ban on the marketing of e-cigarettes, warning labels on the packaging, and a limit on the amount of nicotine in the products and regulators in the U.K. have a host of restrictions on the marketing of the products and have already started banning some advertisements.
 
Read more of TINA.org’s coverage of e-cigarettes here.
 
This story was originally published on 3/24/14 and has been updated several times. 
 

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Keep your skin glowing this monsoon
Here are some tips to keep your skin healthy and glowing in this weather from Aakriti Kochar, beauty and make-up expert, Oriflame India
 
Change in weather during the monsoon means a change in one's skin care regime. With oiliness, dehydration and acne being the main problems to deal with, prepare your skin during the challenging summer months this year with some helpful tips.
 
Dust particles easily tend to settle on your skin which eventually damages the regular soft and toned look your skin possesses. Here are some tips to keep your skin healthy and glowing in this weather from Aakriti Kochar, beauty and make-up expert, Oriflame India.
 
* Dampness and humidity clogs your skin pores which does not let it breathe. The idea is to keep it clean and exfoliated, so that the dead cells do not settle and block the skin pores. Exfoliate your skin twice a week with a gentle exfoliator or mask depending on your skin type.
 
* Keep your skin clean to avoid any fungal infection, which can occur quickly during this time. The skin should be properly cleaned three to four times a day with non-soapy face washes. This helps in removing excessive oil and dirt from the skin pores and helps it breathe.
 
* Use a toner each time you wash your face to close the pores and restore your skin's pH balance. An anti-bacterial toner will prevent skin breakouts and infections.
 
* Moisturising your face is equally important. Use a light lotion-based moisturiser or serum, which will gently rehydrate your skin.
 
* Don't think that rain or cold weather automatically means you can't get burned. Use a sunscreen even on a cloudy day. This will help you in staying away from ultraviolet rays.
 
* Avoid heavy makeup during monsoons. Maintain your natural charm and glow and go for water-proof make up products. Also, make sure that you are storing your make up products hygienically in a cool and dry place.

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