Citizens' Issues
After Nepal quake, India may be next: Experts

According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Saturday's quake, measuring 6 on the Richter scale in Delhi, had a depth of 10 km and its impact lasted up to one minute

 

In the wake of the strong 7.9 magnitude earthquake that killed over a 1,500 people in Nepal and left a swathe of devastation in the northern Himalayas on Saturday, experts said a temblor of equal intensity is "overdue" in northern India."
 
"An earthquake of the same magnitude is overdue. That may happen either today or 50 years from now... in the region of the Kashmir, Himachal, Punjab and Uttrakhand Himalyas. Seismic gaps have been identified in these regions," B.K. Rastogi, the director general of the Ahmedabad-based Institute of Seismological Research, told IANS on the phone.
 
This is because the movement of tectonic plates generates stress over time, and rocks at the surface break in response. When the stress accumulates, every 100 km stretch of the 2,000-km-long Himalyas can be hit by a high-magnitude earthquake.
 
"The accumulation of stress is going on everywhere. But where it will reach the elastic limit, we don't know nor also when. But what we do know is that it is happening everywhere," Rastogi added.
 
"With 20 such locations that are prone to high-intensity earthquakes, it takes 200 years for an earthquake of this magnitude to happen on this belt. In 1833, the same epicentre - 80 km northwest of Kathmandu - an earthquake of 7.5 magnitude had hit the region," he said.
 
According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Saturday's quake, measuring 6 on the Richter scale in Delhi, had a depth of 10 km and its impact lasted up to one minute. 
 
The US Geological Survey said the epicentre was in Nepal's Lamjung district some 75 km from Kathmandu. The aftershocks were felt even half-an-hour after the quake and some lasted till evening.
 
Rastogi said that the earthquake uplifted the rocks by four meters, rupturing an area 100 km long and 50 meters wide of the epicentre.
 
Scientist PR Vaidya at IMD here, said Nepal falls on the Alpine-Himalayan belt, one among the three seismic belts on the Earth's surface, which is responsible for 10 percent of the world's earthquakes.
 
The Apline-Himalayn belt, which is prone to high-intensity earthquakes, runs through New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, the Andaman and Nicobar Islands and northeast India, from where it turns to Nepal and then to Jammu and Kashmir, up to Afghanistan and the Mediterranean Sea. It finally ends in Europe.
 
The world's greatest earthquake belt, the circum-Pacific seismic belt, is found along the rim of the Pacific Ocean, where about 80 percent of the world's largest temblors occur.
 
Rastogi said within the 40-km-range of the epicentre, the scale of damage has been very high, with a total collapse of buildings.
 
The aftershocks, he added, would be felt for two days in case of a "strong" earthquake" of about magnitude 8.
 
"Even small buildings that were hit in the first wave may be damaged by the aftershocks if not designed properly. And the aftershocks may continue for one or two months," he said.
 
About 40 million years ago, India was 5,000 km south of where the Himalyas now stand. With the continental shift, India and the Asian continent came closer to form the Himalayas.
 
"And the process of movement continues at about two cm every year. The Indian landmass today is pushing the Asian landmass and that generates stress," Rastogi said.
 
Scientist Vaidya said: "Earthquakes happen because of the theory of plate tectonics, which means with the movement of tactonic plates, stress in generated in the rocks."
 
The quake claimed nearly 40 lives in India, causing widespread destruction in parts of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal.
 
Earthquakes, however don't kill, said Vaidya. "It's the damage caused to the structures around us that cause the loss of life."
 

User

Telecom operators summoned over call drops, excess billing
Concerned over widespread complaints from consumers across the country about excess billing, incessant call-drops and poor quality of services, telecom operators have ben summoned by the government on Monday to review the situation and find remedies.
 
The meeting is to be chaired by Telecom Secretary Rakesh Garg, official sources said, adding that a letter has been dispatched on the matter, a copy of which was obtained by IANS.
 
"It has been decided to hold a meeting to review the quality of service issues related to excess billing, non-transparency in billing system, frequent call drops, etc. in the telecom networks of respective licensed service with special emphasis on Mumbai, Maharashtra and Delhi," it said.
 
The letter further asked all the relevant chief executives or chairpersons and managing directors of both the state-run Bharat Sanchar Nigam and Mahanagar Telephone Nigam, as also the private players to make it convenient to attend the meeting.
 
Subscribers across the country have been complaining about constant call drops for months now. India has 987 million telecom subscribers. 
 
Communications and Information Technology Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad had directed his ministry officials to hold an immediate meeting Friday to expedite the process of improving the reach and quality of telecom signal from the state-run Bharat Sanchar Nigam.
 
According to officials, Prasad also wanted them to have a face-to-face interaction with members of parliament, to not only make them answerable but also spell out their problems and come up with possible solutions.
 
Following the meeting, officials said, the scope of such an interaction has been expanded.
 
"Members of parliament from the states of Rajasthan, Himachal Pradesh and North Eastern states were invited in yesterday's meeting," an official statement said, adding that the lawmakers were also apprehensive about private players "obstructing the growth" of the state-run firm.
 
"Prasad has directed the department to call five such meetings so that all members of parliament are given an opportunity to raise issues directly with the officials concerned," the statement added.
 
The telecom department has also been asked to explore the possibility of setting up a dedicated cell in the state-run telecom company to monitor the effectiveness of its network in the border areas and those affected by extremism.
 
The lawmakers said they would arrange for land for the state-run companies to set up the towers to improve the quality of service, as also funds from their allocated kitty. They however wanted officials of the home and defence ministries to be present as well to address the problems.

User

FTIL flays complaint based on PwC report

The company said it has learnt from media reports that the metropolitan magistrate's court in Andheri has, by an ex-parte order, "directed registration of an FIR inter alia against FTIL"

 

Questioning the legitimacy of Pricewaterhouse Coopers (PwC) audit report on the Multi Commodities Exchange of India (MCX), Financial Technologies (India) Ltd on Sunday termed a complaint filed against it on the reports' findings "baseless and highly motivated".
 
The complaint "has been filed with the mala fide intent to put pressure on NSEL (National Spot Exchange Ltd) and (parent company) FTIL in a bid to extort the monies allegedly lost by him (complainant Ketan Shah) while trading in commodities on NSEL's exchange platform through his broker under client-broker agreement," FTIL said in a statement.
 
It said Shah had earlier attempted to file the same complaint with the MIDC (Andheri) police station, which was turned down by police on the ground that similar complaints on the PwC report filed by MCX were probed and found to be without any substance.
 
The company said it has learnt from media reports that the metropolitan magistrate's court in Andheri has, by an ex-parte order, "directed registration of an FIR inter alia against FTIL".
 
"FTIL has not yet received the copy of the FIR or Ketan Shah's complaint. As and when the same is received, FTIL shall extend full support and cooperation in the investigation and firmly believes that the truth of the matter must come out," it said.
 
Industry chamber Assocham said earlier this month that it has written to Finance Minister Arun Jaitley to reconsider the draft merger order of NSEL with its parent firm in the larger interests of domestic trade and industry.
 

 

The controversy took a new turn on March 31 with the FTIL management proposing a settlement with traders who lost their money while dealing at the commodity bourse.
 

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)