Citizens' Issues
After Bihar liquor ban, alcohol sellers flourish on India-Nepal border
Kathmandu : The complete ban on alcohol in India's Bihar state seems to have come as a boon for small traders in Nepal who sell low-quality alcohol. Reports here say there has been a sudden rise in small huts along the India-Nepal border to target alcohol customers from Bihar.
 
Authorities from India's border districts have sought help and cooperation from their Nepali counterparts to check the possible smuggling of alcohol and increase in surveillance along the border.
 
Bihar imposed a complete ban on sale of alcohol from April 1.
 
At a recent meeting in Forbesganj in Bihar, Indian authorities sought help from their Nepali counterparts to curb the movement of people seeking alcohol from Nepal.
 
Toyam Rai, chief district officer of Sunsari district who led the Nepali team, said that due to the open international border, there was high chance of smuggling of alcohol from Nepal to India, and so the Indian authorities asked Nepal to cooperate in preventing the smuggling.
 
Himanshu Sharma, district magistrate of Araria in Bihar, local police chiefs and others also participated as part of the Indian side in the meeting.
 
Reports said mostly people from the working class come to the Nepali side to buy alcohol. But when there is a holiday, businessmen and youth also cross the border.
 
Local hoteliers say there has been a 2-3 fold rise in sale of alcohol in the past one week, since the ban in Bihar.
 
Nepali traders have now increased the prices of local alcohol, but reports said the quality was quite poor due to the sudden rise in demand.
 
"With the ban on alcohol in Bihar, the Indian authorities have asked us to curb the smuggling of alcohol from Nepal. They are also concerned that after the ban, criminals may sneak into Nepal that will further invite security complications," said Sunsari Superintendent of Police Sandip Bhandari.
 
"With this new unfolding situation, we may face new security threats along the border," said Rai. "We have assured the Indian side about the security arrangements on the border."
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

Bapoo Malcolm

1 year ago

Dad used to say that no one can curb what one eats, drinks or wears.

My friends had set up a distillery in Gujrat, only to close it down due to heavy competition. A bottle of beer increases by Rs. 10 with every crossing. There were lanes in Ahmedabad that were reserved for each type of liquor; one for whiskey, another for rum and so on. ONE LEANED OUT OF A CAR WINDOW AND EXCHANGED CASH FOR A BOTTLE OR TWO. Nary a word took place.

Only the cops and politicians benefitted.

This place is too small to tell the many such stories. The whole thing is a joke. A cruel one.

Jaitley justifies one percent duty on gold jewellery

Jewellers went on strike opposing one percent excise duty on gold jewellery. The strike enters 40th day on Sunday

 

Justifying the imposition of one percent excise duty on gold jewellery, union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley on Sunday said a luxury item like gold should not be exempted from the manufacturing tax when the country is moving towards Goods and Services Tax.
 
"There is no reason why a luxury item like gold should be kept out of the ambit of a manufacturing tax like excise duty. Since the manufacturing tax is levied on essential commodities like steel, cement, jute, cotton and others, why not on gold.
 
"The country is to move towards Goods and Services Tax (GST). Gold will also follow towards GST. Most states levy value added tax on gold," he said.
 
He also noted that if gold is kept out of GST ambit, tax rate on rest of the goods will have to be increased. "There is no reason why a luxury item should be exempted from the tax and a higher rate of tax be imposed on other goods," he said.
 
The government, in the Budget for 2016-17, had proposed one percent excise duty on jewellery without input credit or 12.5 percent with input tax credit on jewellery excluding silver other than those studded with diamonds and precious stones.
 
Jewellers went on strike opposing one percent excise duty on gold jewellery. The strike enters 40th day on Sunday.
 
The central government subsequently clarified even for one percent excise duty, manufacturers were allowed to take credit of input services, which could be utilised for payment of duty on jewellery.
 
It further said that only jewellers, whose turnover in the preceding financial year was more than Rs12 crore, will be liable to pay the excise duty and those having turnover below Rs12 crore would be eligible for exemption unto Rs 6 crore during next financial year.
 
"Jeweller's private records or records for state value added tax or records for Bureau of Indian Standards (in the case of hallmarked jewellery) will be accepted for all central excise purposes," it clarified.
 
Also, there is no requirement to file a stock declaration to the jurisdictional central excise authorities, it added.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 

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COMMENTS

Param

1 year ago

the stubbornness of jewelers clearly shows the confidence they have that public will make govt cede to their demands to open the shops. i hope jaitley sticks to his stand... when i pay tax on essentials, not taxing jewelry does not make any sense!

Tea without sugar more effective than IPL ban
Mumbai can save 150 percent more water by drinking tea without sugar for a day than can be saved by banning a season of Indian Premier League (IPL) in three Maharashtra stadia, IndiaSpend calculations reveal.
 
The Bombay High Court suggested that the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) reconsider its decision to hold IPL matches in Maharashtra because of a widespread drought but refused to stay the first match to be played at Mumbai's Wankhede Stadium on Friday.
 
Maharashtra’s three stadia – at Mumbai, Pune and Nagpur – would use 6 million litres of water for the 20 matches, according to the petitioner, an advocacy called the Loksatta Movement.
 
While this seems like a lot of water, there are more effective ways of saving water than not watering cricket grounds, if we use the concept of embedded water – the water used in production of a product.
 
Agriculture consumes almost 85 percent of water consumed in India, according to the India Infrastructure Report 2011. We consume water for drinking, bathing, cooking and even washing cars, but we consume much more water through food. This is because large quantities of water are used to grow and process that food. For example, an estimate by National Geographic says more than 1,500 litres of water are used to produce half-a-kg of chicken, and nearly 1,000 litres to produce a bottle of wine.
 
“(The real culprit) is the state’s policy that encourages production of the water-guzzling sugarcane,” Sunil Jain wrote in the Financial Express.
 
National Geographic also tells us that more than 1,500 litres of water is used to produce a kg of sugar. Now, even if we assume that approximately 20 percent of Mumbai’s population, or 2.5 million people, drink a cup of tea every day with a teaspoon of sugar, that comes to nearly 10,000 kg of sugar.
 
This sugar has 15 million litres of water embedded – meaning, it has cost us 15 million litres of water to produce this much sugar. That is 2.5 times the water to be used in the three IPL venues in Maharashtra.
 
Of course, this calculation has many approximations. For one, estimates of how much water is embedded in different foods vary widely, and can be different in different places. For another, we have no way of knowing how many cups of tea (or coffee or cold coffee or milk or aerated drinks) are consumed every day in the city. However, the calculation is an indication that intuition may not serve us well when it comes to issues such as water conservation.
 
One may point out that not consuming sugar for a day will only reduce the demand for sugar infinitesimally, and will most probably not reduce the production of sugar even next year. Obviously, it will not have any impact on the water situation in Marathwada today. But then, so wouldn’t using less water in Wankhede Stadium. After all, the water not used in Wankhede would not be transported more than 400 km away to Latur in the crisis-ridden Marathwada region in Maharashtra.
 
The High Court probably knows this, but its intention is to focus the attention of people on what is happening to fellow citizens. Focusing on sugar consumption is a much better way of doing that because unlike cricket, growing sugarcane is a significant part of the water problem in large parts of Maharashtra and India.
 
Sugarcane uses a disproportionately high amount of water, a Current Science study explained.
 
Of 650 billion cubic metres (BCM) of water available for irrigation nationwide, 15 percent, or 100 BCM, is used by sugarcane (the crop uses water from reservoirs as well as groundwater), which is planted on no more than 2.5 percent of India’s farmland, as IndiaSpend recently reported.
 
In the Marathwada region, the number of sugar mills has gone up from 40 in 2009-10 to 52 in 2014-15.
 
Agriculture and other sectors compete for the same water, and overuse, as with sugarcane, affects Indians in many other ways, such as shortage of drinking water, electricity generation and the like. Enabling farmers to grow alternative crops has to be part of the solution, as many experts have explained.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

suneel kumar gupta

1 year ago

same holds true for Day & night matches when it can be played during the day also.

REPLY

Param

In Reply to suneel kumar gupta 1 year ago

valid point. while villages don't have electricity, ipl matches enjoy floodlights just because it makes the whole affair crowd pleasing!!!

Param

1 year ago

happy to hear that high court thinks that wasting water in a place where people do not have water to drink is unacceptable!
next in line should be 5-star marriage parties that waste food in a place where people do not have enough to eat. next in line should be ambani's mega house in a place where people do not have a place to sleep.
cheers!

S Bethamangalkar

1 year ago

I learn from a social activist who has promoted building of check dams in Satara district that his villagers have switched to other crops precisely to reduce the consumption of water and revive the soil quality.

S Bethamangalkar

1 year ago

The sugar that is already in the market has consumed all the water it could! It's like bolting the stable after the horse has bolted!

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