Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
900 mn Indians live in 2 rooms or less
For 10 years, Degal Srimangar Sao, 26, has been sleeping in the corridor of a central Mumbai commercial complex, where he delivers tea every two hours to busy corporate employees.
 
Vijay, as he prefers to be called in Mumbai, is from Kharkatto, a village of 300 homes and 1,765 people - nearly 1,800 km northeast of Mumbai - in Hazaribagh district in the Gangetic-plains Hindi-heartland state of Jharkhand. His nine-member extended family -seven without Vijay and elder brother Puran, who also lives in a Mumbai office corridor - live in a three-room house.
 
Like Vijay, about 900 million Indians, or nearly 75 per cent of India’s households - with an average family size of five - live in two rooms or less, according to the latest data released by the government in June 2016.
 
Of the 900 million, 630 million, or more than half of all households, live in rural areas, with 262 million, or 20%, in urban areas. There does not appear to be a correlation between income and the size of homes, with some of India’s poorer states boasting larger homes than richer states and vice versa.
 
No more than 106 million urban households, or 9% of all Indian households, live in homes with more than three rooms. About 185 million Indians in rural areas, or 15% of all Indian households, live in houses with three or more rooms.
 
Data on the average size of rooms is not available with the Census of India.
 
Kerala has India’s largest homes
 
The people of Kerala - India’s seventh-richest by per capita income - live in India’s largest homes.
 
As many as 79% of rural households and 84% of the urban population in Kerala live in houses with more than three rooms, data from the 2014 baseline survey for Sample Registration System of the Census of India shows.
 
Kerala is followed by Jammu and Kashmir and Assam - 21st and 27th in terms of per capita income - with 66% and 34% rural, and 60% and 45% of the urban population living in relatively larger houses.
 
Jharkhand, Telangana and Andhra Pradesh are the only states among the 23 big states for which the data has been released where more than half of all families live in two-room houses, both in rural and urban areas.
 
Vijay stays away from his family, wife, children and parents, except for an annual two-week visit home. Seven members of his family stay in a three-room mud house in their village, which he detests.
 
He is not sure whether he is really "content" in Mumbai or with his home. “Pasand ka sawaal nahi hai saab; karna padta hai (There is no question of me liking it, I have to do it),” said Vijay.
 
In Tamil Nadu, Bihar and West Bengal, 48%, 44% and 43% of the population lives in one room or no room - which could mean they are homeless.
 
Last year, along with his brother Puran, who also works in Mumbai, Vijay started building a brick-cement-mortar house for his family in his village; two rooms are complete.
 
To complete the renovation of his mud-house, Vijay needs to keep earning money and holding down expenses. “Mumbai mein raho to har mahina paisa bhej sakte hai, aur kharcha bahut kam ho jata hai (If you stay in Mumbai, you can send money home every month and expenses are low).”
 
Urban Maharashtra has the smallest houses
 
Of India’s states, Maharashtra has the highest proportion of urban population that is homeless or lives in one room: Half.
 
Maharashtra also has the maximum proportion of “urban slum units” (blocks of population living in slums), with 53% of all homes in slums, largely due to the slums that proliferate in the Mumbai metropolitan region, home to about 19 million people.
 
With 43% of its urban population living in one room or homeless, Tamil Nadu follows Maharashtra; West Bengal is next with 38% homeless or in one-room homes.
 
Vijay is one of those who represents Maharashtra’s cramped urban conditions: He lives in the corridors of a commercial building to maximise his earning and minimise his expenses, as many of India’s 360 million migrants do. In June 2016, IndiaSpend explored how this economic imperative played out with migrants forced out of their traditional homes.
 
Although Vijay’s village is not short of water and his father ploughs the land every monsoon and regularly reaps a paddy crop, it isn’t enough for the family. So, Vijay lives in Mumbai, sleeps in a corridor and, slowly, rebuilds the family home.
 
“In two years, my five-room pucca (brick-cement-mortar) home will be built,” said Vijay. “My father will be able to sleep in his own room, for the first time.”
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

Ralph Rau

5 months ago

The great dream of every young man. Save. Save. Save for that dream home if not in the big, bad, over-crowded city then back in the Gaon where you can enjoy if not the largest room then at least the highest ceiling - the starry night sky .

Indian businesses lost $1 mn from data loss in one year: EMC
Indian businesses lost over $1 million from data loss and downtime in the last 12 months, a survey by EMC Corporation -- the world's largest data storage multinational -- revealed on Tuesday.
 
"Organisations are getting better at protecting themselves against traditional threats to data but new threats mean that despite progress, more businesses are losing data than before," said Ripu Bajwa, Country Manager-Data Protection Solutions at EMC in a statement.
 
Highlighting the growing challenges of protecting data, the research commissioned by EMC and carried out by technology market research provider Vanson Bourne revealed that average cost of data loss to Indian organisations was more than $114,000 while globally, the costs was more than $914,000. 
 
In India, 46% of organisations suffered unplanned system downtime and/or data loss due to an external or internal security breach, the study found.
 
While majority (over 80%) of businesses think that their organisation's current data protection solution will not enable them to meet all future business challenges, Cloud is changing the game for Indian organisations when it comes to data protection.
 
In India, on average, 34% of organisations have their IT environment in public Cloud and more than 60% organisations believe that not all their data stored in the Cloud is protected.
 
"Our customers are facing a rapidly evolving data protection landscape on a number of fronts, whether it's to protect modern cloud computing environments or to shield against devastating cyber attacks. Our research shows that many businesses are unaware of the potential impact and are failing to plan for them, which is a threat in itself," noted David Goulden, CEO, EMC Information Infrastructure.
 
Nearly half (54%) of organisations surveyed in India were not very confident they could fully recover their systems or data in the event of data loss or unexpected systems downtime. 
 
Moreover, only 42% of respondents said they were confident that their solutions would be able to keep pace with the faster performance and new capabilities of flash storage. 
 
Ransomware is dramatically raising the stakes when it comes to cyber security. 
 
"We're moving from theft, which is costly, to potential catastrophe. There are forces at play now that aren't satisfied with just stealing your money; they want to destroy your entity. You can either start taking these threats seriously or start looking for a hole to crawl into," Goulden added.
 
To address the threats, EMC has announced to launch a new "Isolated Recovery Solutions" line to help organisations "air gap" a protection instance of their data from the networked enterprise.
 
The EMC-sponsored global research survey covered IT decision-makers at 2,200 organisations to index data protection maturity, threats and trends.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Sindhutai Sapkal: Online petition making waves, CM Fadnavis, Ministers Maneka Gandhi, Piyush Goyal promise swift action
An online petition seeking justice for noted social reformer Sindhutai Sapkal alias Mai, the mother of orphans, initiated by Founder-Trustee of Moneylife Foundation, Sucheta Dalal, has so been signed by 20,419 people (at 5.45pm, as on 5 July 2016), from across the country. The petition hosted in Change.org seeks to prevent over 1000 children from being forcibly returned to government orphanages. Here is the link to the online petition https://www.change.org/p/devendra-fadnavis-stop-harassing-sindhutai-sapkal-don-t-close-down-her-orphanages. The petition has got the government to act. 
 
While Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis told Moneylife that state government "has started the process", Union Women and Child Development Minister Maneka Gandhi said she had asked the state government to intervene in the issue. Earlier, immediately after hearing about the online petition, Union Minister for Power Piyush Goyal too had offered help.
 
In a message, CM Fadnavis said, "We have started the process." Later the CM's Office CMO tweeted about asking the concerned official to grant permission to Mai's organisation.
 
CM Devendra Fadnavis, Sindhutai Sapkal, Sanmati Bal Niketan
 
Union Minister Gandhi, in a tweet on Monday also said she is examining the issue of Sindhutai's orphanages. 
Ms Dalal had said in the petition that "the government orphanages are severely underfunded and overpopulated. There is no room for these children and their lives will be destroyed by this hasty decision. Sindhutai Sapkal has dedicated her whole life to bringing up orphaned children with singular dedication and devotion. The quality upbringing she provides these children - including food, stay and education - has led to many of these children growing up to become lawyers and doctors. Sindhutai has been trying to get her orphanages registered since 2011. The Government made her run around and refused to cooperate. Now they want to shut her down for not being registered." 
 
The online petition is addressed to CM Fadnavis and Union Minister Gandhi to help Sindhutai continue her great work.
 
As reported by Moneylife, Maharashtra’s Department of Women and Child Development (WCD), pressures Sapkal to oust orphans residing in her Sanmati Bal Niketan and hand them over to the department to rehabilitate them to government orphanages. Reason? Because Sanmati Bal Niketan is not registered with WCD and hence, is being considered as an illegal entity. This, despite Sapkal running from pillar to post, since 2011, in order to have the institution registered.
 
Maharashtra has no funds for its own orphanages, but was attempting to orphan the ‘Mother of Orphans’. Recently in the WCD committee meeting held at Aurangabad, its minister, Pankaja Munde did not take any decision on the financial grant of Rs200 crore, for meals for the 150-odd government orphanages in Maharashtra, due to alleged lack of funds. This has sent nervous signals across orphanages in the state.

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COMMENTS

S.S.A.Zaidi

5 months ago

I am so happy .But did it need a petition???

Dr. Rakesh Goyal

5 months ago

CONGRATS

subramanian dharmarajan

5 months ago

the title of the petition could have been more respectful.it seemed as if the MH CM was directly involved in this.Just like pm modi is held directly responsible if someone has constipation..And hopefuly a thank you note is also due from sucheta and company.

Suketu Shah

5 months ago

The power of unity in a positive direction.Congrats Ms Dalal and moneylife.Congrats respected CM Mr Fadnavis for jet speed quick action-Maharashtra's best CM ever.

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