Citizens' Issues
50 new declassified files on Netaji released
New Delhi : The government on Tuesday released 50 more declassified files related to Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose.
 
This was posted on web portal www.netajipapers.gov.in by Culture Minister Mahesh Sharma.
 
Files released on Tuesday include matters pertaining to Netaji's ashes and the probe into his disappearance following the controversial air crash of 1945 in which he is believed to have perished.
 
The latest release of 50 files will further meet the "continued public demand" to access these files and this will also help scholars carry out further research on Bose's role in India's freedom movement, an official source said.
 
The new batch of 50 files consists of 10 files from the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO), 10 from the home ministry and 30 files from the external affairs ministry, pertaining to the period from 1956 to 2009.
 
The first batch of 100 files relating to Netaji, after their preliminary conservation, treatment and digitisation, was put in the public domain by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on January 23 - on the occasion of the 119th birth anniversary of the freedom fighter. 
 
In 1997, the National Archives of India had received 990 declassified files pertaining to the Indian National Army (Azad Hind Fauj) from the defence ministry, and in 2012 1,030 files/items pertaining to the Khosla Commission (271 files/items) and Justice Mukherjee Commission of Inquiry (759 files/items) from the home ministry. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

EgyptAir hijack drama ends, hijacker arrested
Cairo/Nicosia : An Egyptian man who hijacked an EgyptAir flight to Cyprus was arrested on Tuesday after hours of negotiations during which most passengers were freed and the last of the seven on board escaped.
 
The Cyprus foreign ministry announced the arrest of the hijacker, who had taken charge of the Airbus 320 when it was on its way from Alexandria to Cairo saying he was armed with explosives. The plane was flown to Larnaca in southern Cyprus.
 
Larnaca airport, on the south coast of Cyprus, and officials opened negotiations with the man, who was identified as Seif El Din Mustafa. The man was mistakenly named earlier as Ibrahim Samaha, a passenger.
 
Hours after the plane landed in Larnaca, Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades said the hijacking was not linked to terrorism. Officials said the man appeared to be in love with a woman living in Cyprus.
 
BBC said Flight 181 carried 56 passengers -- 30 Egyptians and 26 foreigners -- and six crew members. Soon after it reached Cyprus, all but seven passengers and crew were let off. 
 
They quickly boarded buses to reach the terminal. EgyptAir said a special plane will bring them back to Egypt.
 
The foreigners on board included eight Americans, four Britons and four Dutch citizens, two Belgians and two Greeks, a French national, an Italian and a Syrian. Three other foreigners could not be identified.
 
Before the hijack drama ended, President Anastasiades said Cyprus was doing all it could to ensure the safe release of the passengers and crew.
 
Asked if the hijacker was motivated by love, he laughed and said: "Always there is a woman involved."
 
An unidentified civil aviation official in Cyprus was quoted by the media as saying that the man handed negotiators an envelope which he asked to be given to a woman in Cyprus.
 
Earlier, Egypt's civil aviation minister Sherif Fathy said the seven still on board the jet included the pilot, the co-pilot, a female stewardess, a security officer and three passengers whose nationalities were not revealed.
 
Fathy said negotiations with the hijacker were continuing but it was not clear whether the man indeed had explosives or was lying.
 
The Egyptian aviation ministry had earlier said the hijacker had threatened to detonate an explosives belt, forcing the captain to divert the flight to Cyprus.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

As FBI hacks into Apple iPhone, fears rise about users' security
Washington/New Delhi : As the news spread of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) hacking into the encrypted Apple iPhone of one of the terrorists involved in California shooting, a top US security firm has expressed fears of backdoor approach to put users' security at hackers' mercy.
 
In a statement shared with IANS on Tuesday, US software security firm Symantec Corporation said that while it understands the concerns expressed by some members of law enforcement, the firm does not support any initiative that would intentionally weaken security technologies. 
 
"Putting backdoors or introducing security vulnerabilities into encryption products introduces new avenues of attack, and reduces the security of the broader Internet. We are committed to supporting law enforcement efforts to protect citizens and organizations online, without compromising the integrity and security of encryption technology," the firm said.
 
According to media reports, a third party helped the FBI crack the security function without erasing contents of the iPhone used by Syed Farook. Farook, along with his wife Tashfeen Malik, planned and executed the December 2, 2015, shooting that left 14 people killed at San Bernardino, California.
 
"This case should never have been brought. We will continue to help law enforcement with their investigations, as we have done all along, and we will continue to increase the security of our products as the threats and attacks on our data become more frequent and more sophisticated," Apple said in a statement.
 
"This case raised issues which deserve a national conversation about our civil liberties, and our collective security and privacy," the statement said.
 
From the beginning, "we objected to the FBI's demand that Apple build a backdoor into the iPhone because we believed it was wrong and would set a dangerous precedent. As a result of the government's dismissal, neither of these occurred," it added.
 
Apple believes deeply that people in the US and around the world deserve data protection, security and privacy. Sacrificing one for the other only puts people and countries at greater risk.
 
In a earlier report released this year, Symantec’s security intelligence team had predicted that the opportunities for cybercriminals to compromise Apple devices will grow in 2016.
 
Apple devices have experienced a surge in popularity in recent years. “This increase in usage has not gone unnoticed by attackers. A rising number of threat actors have begun developing specific malware designed to infect devices running Mac OS X or iOS,” the report said.
 
Although the number of threats targeting Apple operating systems remains quite low when compared to the company’s main competitors (Windows in the desktop space and Android in mobile), the amount uncovered has grown steadily in recent years.
 
“In tandem with this, the level of Apple-related malware infections has spiked, particularly in the past 18 months,” the report predicted.
 
“Apple users should not be complacent about security and change their perception that Apple devices are free from malware -- this perception opens up opportunities for cybercriminals to take advantage of these users,” Symantec said.
 
Recently, Apple CEO Tim Cook, referring to the ongoing battle with the US government over encryption to unlock an iPhone, reiterated the company's commitment to protect its users' data and privacy.
 
Addressing a packed auditorium at its Cupertino, California-based headquarters, Cook said: "We have a responsibility to help you protect your data and your privacy. We will not shrink from this responsibility."
 
"We built the iPhone for you, our customers, and for many of us it is a deeply personal device," he told the gathering during a special launch event this month.
 
With the FBI hacking, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) scrapped its request for Apple Inc.'s assistance to hack into the phone of a terrorist killer.
 
On Monday, the federal government department, on behalf of the FBI, made the move at a US court in Central California, Xinhua news agency reported.
 
The two-page court filing said that the FBI had accessed data stored on the iPhone 5c.
 
It is now Apple's turn to figure out, and for iPhone users to wonder, how secure is the phone and data on the device.
 
In this scenario, top US companies Google, Facebook and Snapchat are also expanding encryption of user data in their services.
 
While Whatsapp is set to roll out encryption for its voice calls in addition to its existing privacy features, Google is investigating "extra uses" for encryption in secure email.
 
Social networking giant Facebook too is working on to better protect its Messenger service.
 
The popular messaging service Snapchat is also considering a more secure messaging system.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)