Consumer Issues
5 steps to connect WhatsApp from your computer

The web client of WhatsApp mirrors conversations and messages from the mobile device. At present, it can be accessed only on Google Chrome

 

Popular instant messaging application WhatsApp has launched its web services. With this service, the mobile user can access the application on Google Chrome browsers.
 
Here is how you can access WhatsApp on your PC/desktop
 
1. Update the WhatsApp app to the latest version in your phone.
 
2. Go to https://web.whatsapp.com in a Google Chrome browser (at present only Chrome is supported).
 
3. From WhatsApp on your mobile, open menu, choose WhatsApp Web.
 
4. You will see a window for QR code scanning on your mobile
 
5. Scan the QR code from the website (from your PC) and you are ready to go. You have now paired WhatsApp on your phone with the WhatsApp web client.
 
Your phone needs to stay connected to the internet for the web client to work. Also, there is no option to stop the web client from downloading images, videos automatically.
 
Also uncheck the option to stay connected, if you are using your office PC or a computer not owned by you. When this option is unchecked, you will be automatically logged out after several minutes of inactivity.
 
This service is currently available to Android, Windows and Blackberry users.
 

User

COMMENTS

Sreekanth Yelicherla

2 years ago

I reported a typo. I see now that it is corrected in the article. But also, my comment was deleted too! STRANGE! Hopefully this comment wouldn't be deleted too.

Shashank S

2 years ago

If you are not able to see whatsapp web in your menu. Please update to latest version of Whatsapp and restart your phone!!

REPLY

MDT

In Reply to Shashank S 2 years ago

Thanks for your comment. But there is no need to restart the device after updating to latest version of WhatsApp. For Android, the latest version (with web menu) of WhatsApp is 2.11.498.
Regards,
MDT

India’s Current Account to swing into surplus for the first time since 2004
According to Morgan Stanley estimates, India’s current account will swing into a minor surplus of 0.3% of GDP in 2015 on improving terms of trade and decline in gold imports
 
India’s current account has been consistently in deficit over the last 10 years. Indeed, in 2012 it reached a peak of 5% of GDP. However, the current account deficit has been narrowing steadily since then, to an estimated 1.6% of GDP in 2014. Morgan Stanley, in a report, estimates that the current account of India will swing into a minor surplus of 0.3% of GDP in 2015 (0.1% in F2016). The summary of the surplus position is shown in the chart below:
 
 
Morgan Stanley cites improving terms of trade, helped by declining global commodity prices (specifically oil) and a decline in gold imports as inflation expectations normalize to 5%-6% and real deposit rates remain decidedly positive. This is shown in the chart below:
 
Morgan Stanley expects the current account to move back into deficit in F2017. However, it estimates the deficit to be relatively small at 1.1% of GDP – and well within policy makers’ comfort zone of 2.5% of GDP.
 
The research note however, warns that given India’s high dependence on oil imports (with approximately 75% of total consumption being imported), a swing in oil prices would have a meaningful impact on the outlook for the current account balance. The data in this regard is shown in the table below:
 

User

COMMENTS

Kailash Ganesan

9 months ago

Can you show me whether we had surplus in 2004 ? Govt. site clearly tells that we had deficits refer http://www.indiabudget.nic.in

vishal

2 years ago

gold imports might have come down but this will have no impact on its prices internally. This factor might affect current account deficit. Again a lot of gold is being smuggled inside the country. This will act as a barrier for keeping investments elsewhere. The only plus factor as of now is crude oil imports. It looks most certainly the price may not jump to affect our growth and exports.

Doctors for Ethical Practices

Efforts of committed medical practitioners to promote ethics in the profession

 
In the early 1990s, a group of doctors, dismayed at the regulatory sloth of the Indian Medical Council, which had led to a rampant increase in unethical medical practices, decided it was time for some action. Eight doctors, known for their ethical practices and concern for the public health system, established the Forum for Medical Ethics (FME) in 1992. 
 
They contested the Maharashtra Medical Council elections and, as expected, lost because of massive rigging of the elections by those supported by money-power and politics. But, as Dr Sunil Pandya, a founder of FME, says: “We were able to generate a public debate on the need for ethics in the elections to medical councils and their role and responsibility through the media”. The FME documented the electoral malpractices in detail and filed a PIL (public interest litigation) in the Bombay High Court. It won the case; the elections were pronounced invalid due to rigging. 
 
The court battle also led to greater bonding and professional camaraderie, which eventually resulted in the formal registration of the Forum for Medical Ethics Society (FMES) with the charity commissioner (Mumbai) as a voluntary, non-profit organisation. 
 
FMES started out by holding monthly meetings to discuss issues in medical ethics and publishing a quarterly newsletter called Medical Ethics. The Society had no funds and worked only with volunteers, who also happened to be reputed medical practitioners passionate about upholding the Hippocratic Oath. 
 
Medical Ethics began as an eight-page quarterly newsletter in August 1993, but soon doubled and quadrupled the pages as it gained wider support from the profession and the public. In January 1996, it was renamed Issues in Medical Ethics and after 2004 is known as the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics. It is now an internationally refereed journal and is also available online. Every submission to the Journal is scrutinised by the editorial staff and then by referees within India or abroad. The Journal’s editorial board comprises well-known international experts from countries as varied in health services as the US, UK, South Africa, China and Belgium, etc. It is being indexed by PubMed.
 
Initially, the Society’s work, mainly the publication of the Journal, was done through volunteering and funds raised from individual donors. Dr Sanjay Nagral, the current publisher of the Journal, says: “Someone donated the paper and someone paid for the printing. All of us worked for free. Even the ‘offices’ of Journal were located in the home of one of the volunteers!” But once the activities expanded, Dr Amar Jesani, another founder member of the Society, suggested holding a biennial ‘National Bioethics Conference’, the surpluses of which were ploughed into funding the Journal. The conferences are held at a teaching institution to keep overheads low. 
 
As with all activities that espouse professional ethics, raising funds for FME’s activities, especially the Journal, is a challenge. “Since we do not accept advertisements from pharma companies as a matter of principle, we have to depend on philanthropists to support the cause. Also, now that we have put the Journal online and traffic on the website is huge, maintaining the website requires professional staff as well as funds,” says Dr Nagral. 
 
The Journal is widely read—not just by doctors but by activists, development professionals and policy-makers. Not surprisingly, that segment of the readership is much larger than that of medical professionals!
 
Donations to FMES are eligible for tax benefits under Section 80G of the Income-Tax Act. You can donate online; the details are given on the Forum’s website. 
 
Forum for Medical Ethics Society
 
0-18, Bhavna, Veer Savarkar Marg, Prabhadevi, Mumbai - 400 025 INDIA 
Telephone: 07506265856

User

COMMENTS

Bapoo Malcolm

2 years ago

While it is a lame excuse, an effect-and-cause story, many doctors justify excessive monetary benefits as pay-back for expensive studies.

The cost of medical education may be high but budding doctors go in with their eyes open. Then ask how many would prefer a doctor as a match for one's child and WHY? It's the money, honey. And it's our society that feeds the unethical standards.

We live in a country where the idiom is "Competitive Corruption".

Bhavesh, are you listening?

Bapoo M. Malcolm

Narendra Doshi

2 years ago

KUDOS FOR YOUR EFFORTS

We are listening!

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